Photo Credit: Header- Kelli Hepler



ARIZONA
~ COLORADO ~ NEVADA ~ NEW MEXICO ~ UTAH


Arizona

https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/byways/states/AZ

Coronado Trail Scenic Byway

Overview

 Coronado Trail Scenic Byway captures thousands of years of history, from Native American Tribes to early pioneers and on. This byway is a little-known secret, a hidden treasure to Arizona’s beautiful desert. Come explore the many pristine trails and views, and think about the rich history that the area has to offer.

123 miles / 197.9 km, Morenci to Springerville

Key Attractions

Coronado Trail Byway Map
  • One of the lesser-known and traveled byways in the region, containing beautiful and pristine landscapes.
  • Hiking, biking, fishing, shopping, lodging, etc.
  • Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest
    • Abundant hiking trails.
    • Many lakes and streams to fish.
    • Wildlife, including deer, antelope, elk, bighorn sheep, wild turkeys, various birds, mountain lions, black bears, and Mexican Grey Wolves.
  • Escudilla National Recreation Trail – near Alpine, AZ about 25 miles south from the beginning of the byway.
    • Hike to Arizona’s 3rd largest peak on a moderately difficult, 3-mile journey.
  • Hannagan Meadow – a village about 50 miles south from the beginning of the byway.
    • Hike to Akre Lake – an easy 3 ½ mile journey.
  • Blue Range Primitive Area – about 56 miles south from the start of the byway.
    • A preserve that contains impressive hiking and horse riding trails.
    • Steeple Trail is a rugged, 13-mile trail that takes you through forest, meadow, desert, and wildlife.

Location

  • Located between Springerville and Morenci, AZ near the eastern border of AZ
  • 174 miles southeast from Flagstaff to Springerville, AZ, 226 miles northeast from Phoenix to Springerville, AZ – get directions from major cities here
  • 216 miles from Phoenix to the bottom of the route (at Morenci, AZ), 289 miles from Flagstaff to the bottom of the route
  • The junction at Main St. Springerville where byway begins – N 34.133° W 109.270°
Historic Route 66 in Arizona

Overview

Route 66 is our country’s “Mother Road,” complete with so much history from our nation’s past. Along the route in Arizona, discover stories of the Dust Bowl, World War II, iconic 1950’s/60’s, traditional family vacations, ancient civilizations, and a fragile desert ecosystem.

The Historic Route 66 remains, though segmented, in four U.S. states. The route is broken up, often paralleling other major roads, throughout Illinois, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Arizona. Clear route markers exist along most of the road. Below we have included directions and specifics for New Mexico and Arizona, if you would like the directions for Illinois and Oklahoma, visit this site.

Historic Route 66 Byway Map

The Arizona portion of Route 66 is a total of 370.0 mi / 595.5 km in length.

Key Attractions

  • Petrified Forest National Park and the Painted Desert (colorful buttes and mesas) – located near Lupton, enter I-40, then head west to exit 311 (the park exit).
  • Walnut Canyon National Monument – 1,000 year old, grand Sinagua Indian ruins and beautiful canyon located just off I-40, exit 240 (Winona) – just follow the road signs to the monument.
  • Winslow, Arizona – small town shopping, eating, and a monument – built to honor the Eagles and their iconic song, “Take it Easy,” which mentions the laid-back town.
  • Museums, mom-and-pop restaurants, and retro hotels, barbershops, motor courts, and eateries dot the landscape of small towns along the entire route.
  • A sample itinerary for Route 66 in Arizona can be found here. Recommended time to travel through all the segments in Arizona is 3 days to a week.

Location
The Arizona segment of Historic Route 66 is a disjoint byway comprised of seven pieces. The first section follows I-40 through Holbrook, then a small section in Joseph City. The fourth section goes through Flagstaff. The fifth section goes through Williams. The sixth section is a little place in Ash Fork. Finally, there is a long section heading west on SR 65 from Seligman to Topock.

Specifically, the sections are:

  • Holbrook, mile marker 289-285
  • Joseph City, mile marker 277-274
  • Winslow, mile marker 257-252
  • Flagstaff, mile marker 211-191
  • Williams, mile marker 167-162
  • Ash Fork, mile marker 146-144
  • Topock, mile marker 167-0
Kaibab Plateau-North Rim Parkway

Overview
Travel through the Kaibab Plateau’s meadows and forests of dense ponderosa pine and mixed conifers to the brink of the spectacular north rim of the Grand Canyon. As beautiful as the North Rim Parkway drive is, it gets even better when supplemented with the views of the Grand Canyon.

Key attractions

AZ-Kaibab-Plateau-Map
  • Beautiful pine, fir, and aspen trees that comprise the scenic Kaibab National Forest.
  • Intriguing animal life – porcupines, mountain lions, bobcats, mule deer, various birds, and the endangered Kaibab squirrel.
  • Scenic views of one of the most iconic landscapes in the world – the Grand Canyon – at the North Rim, which is a staggering 1000 ft. higher than at the South Rim.
  • The community of Jacob Lake consists mainly of an inn, bakery, gas station, and grocery store.

Location

  • The North Rim Parkway begins in the community of Jacob Lake, which is located at the juncture of U.S. Hwy 89 and State Route 67.
  • You will follow State Route 67 for approximately 42 miles/ 68 km where you will reach the North Rim of the Grand Canyon.
  • There is no loop; therefore, you will retrace your path backwards on State Route 67 until you reach Jacob Lake once again.
Red Rock Scenic Byway

Overview

Red Rock Scenic Byway contains some of the most spectacular views that Arizona has to offer. Filled with natural beauty, the short drive is an excellent source of inspiration, history, and activity. Whether you want just a scenic drive during the afternoon or an entire day filled with walking, hiking, biking, or other activities, it is sure to be fun for all ages. Close to Sedona, it is a quick escape into a very unique landscape.

This byway is 7.5 miles / 12.1 km in length.

Key Attractions

Red Rock Byway Map
  • Little Horse Trail and Bell Rock Pathway (northern and southern) Trailheads
    • Be on the lookout for the special rock formations, “Three Nuns,” “Chapel of the Holy Cross,” and “Cathedral Rock”
  • Red Rock Crossing on Oak Creek – situated by the visitor’s center at the south end of the byway (right across from the entrance to Red Rock State Park), enjoy the uniquely formed red sandstone banks on the creek
  • Activities such as biking, golfing, and hiking, as well as driving
  • Beautiful red sandstone accented with colorful cottonwood trees and large, blue skies

Location

  • 31 miles from Flagstaff
    • Take I-17 south from Flagstaff
    • Turn onto AZ-89A south heading toward Sedona
    • In Sedona, merge onto AZ-179 south
    • The byway begins at the intersection of AZ-179 and Back O Beyond Road (N 34.826° W 111.779°)
  • 103 miles from Phoenix
    • Take I-17 north towards Flagstaff
    • Take exit 298 and turn left at AZ-179, going towards Sedona
    • The byway begins about three miles north of the junction of I-17 and AZ-179 (Intersection of AZ-179 and Beaverhead Flat Road near Sedona, AZ (N 34.734° W 111.777°)
Sky Island Scenic Byway

Overview

Explore a section of vast biological diversity in just a few short miles, in Arizona’s Sky Island Scenic Byway. The byway begins in the arid desert, surrounded by redrock, spectacular rock formations, and giant saguaro cacti. Stop along several locations to enjoy recreation, or drive straight through to reach Summerhaven – a village located in a beautiful conifer forest. This byway offers a short distance to see amazing views of the islands in the sky (the clouds that are nearly level with the high altitude you reach).

27 miles / 43.8 km, Mt. Lemmon Highway, Tucson to Ski Valley

Key Attractions

Sky Island Byway Map
  • Grand, rocky cliffs with spectacular views over the arid desert
  • Large populations of the towering saguaro cacti
  • Many unusual rock formations, or hoodoos, including the Geology Vista and Goosehead Rock
  • Ruins of the old WWII internment camps
  • The skyride at the Mt Lemmon and the beautiful aspen-forests at mountain-top
  • Popular pastimes, including: rock climbing, horseback riding, skiing, camping at Rose Canyon Campground, and hiking or fishing at Rose Canyon Lake
  • Retail shopping and relaxing in Summerhaven, AZ – at the end of the route, located in a higher altitude and conifer forest
  • To see pictures of locations along the byway, click here

Location

  • Located in SE Arizona, 14 miles from Tucson, Arizona
  • Directions from Tucson:
    • Take Speedway Blvd east (from the intersection of Speedway Blvd & Campbell Ave) – N 32.236° W 110.944°
    • Follow the Blvd until Wilmot Road, curve onto Tanque Verde Road
    • Turn to the left onto Catalina Hwy
    • The byway begins here, it turns into Mt Lemmon Hwy before passing into Coronado National Forest
    • Intersection of Catalina Hwy and Mt Lemmon Short Rd, Tucson – N 32.304° W 110.745°
  • Names of roads that are part of the byway:
    • Catalina Hwy
    • General Hitchcock Hwy
    • Mt Lemmon Hwy
  • To drive the byway:
    • Drive northeast on Mt Lemmon Hwy from the junction at E Catalina Hwy & N Lemmon Short Road
    • Follow Mt Lemmon Hwy to Summerhaven, AZ, the end of the byway

Gasoline is only available in Tucson
There are restrooms along the way, and camping is available in the Santa Catalina Ranger District

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Colorado

https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/byways/states/CO

Alpine Loop National Back Country Byway

Overview

The Alpine Loop National Back Country Byway is a wild piece of beautiful Colorado land, with some of the best views of the Rocky Mountains there is to be seen. Enjoy roughing it on these partial dirt roads to access pristine mountains, lakes, streams, and trails that are less discovered by travelers. View this incredible area that has been home to ancient Native Americans and more recently miners and pioneers who have left behind relics and ghost towns.

65 miles between the towns of Lake City, Ouray, and Silverton.

Key Attractions

  • Many rivers, streams, and lakes – abundant fishing of rainbow, brook, and cutthroat trout
  • Abundant hiking – five peaks that are over 14,000 feet in elevation – trails right off the byway
  • Mountain biking on the Alpine Loop provides challenging, multi-day opportunities
  • Snowmobiling and skiing during the winter months
  • Rich history and remains of mines and ghost towns from the 1800’s – sites and structures remain from the Gold Rush era and mineral miners
  • Colorful alpine wildflowers in late summer and colorful tress during early fall
  • Mountains shaped by powerful geologic forces – volcanoes, glaciers, wind and rain

Location

  • Located in the southwest quadrant of the state of Colorado
  • Located about 255 miles southwest of Denver, CO (to Lake City) and about 40 miles south of Montrose, CO (to Ouray)
  • Travelers can start their journey in Ouray, Lake City, or Silverton and follow the mostly circular byway in either direction
  • The Alpine Loop joins up with the San Juan Skyway (between Ouray and Silverton) and the Silver Thread Byway (near Lake City)
  • This is a backcountry byway – 4-wheel drive required on dirt or gravel roads (about two-thirds of the byway is a dirt road that is suitable for a 2-wheel drive vehicle)
  • Open for driving from around late-May to late-October
  • Three campgrounds, a picnic area, and 10 restrooms along the byway – visitor information centers, motels/hotels/resorts, RV sites, restaurants, grocery stores, and gas stations are located along this byway

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Collegiate Peaks Scenic and Historic Byway

Overview

The Collegiate Peaks were named after Ivy League professors in 1869, during some friendly competition. Running north to south are Oxford, Harvard, Columbia, Yale, and Princeton Peaks. These peaks help comprise the Sawatch, the highest continuous mountain range in North America. The Collegiate Peaks Byway runs along these impressive peaks and boasts a rich history in the area around, including Native Americans, fur trappers, explorers, miners, ranchers, and railroads.

57 miles along Chaffee County

Key Attractions

  • 14,000+ foot peaks and cliffs rising above the byway (highest concentration in U.S.)
  • Historic structures – such as ghost towns and mines
  • Colorado State Gemstone, Aquamarine, found only in Chaffee County
  • Many (commercially developed) hot springs
  • High altitude ranching
  • Waterfalls, lakes, streams, and rivers – including the Arkansas River
  • Very pronounced wildlife, including bald eagles, falcons, osprey, hawks, pelicans, turkeys, bluebirds, hummingbirds, marmots, pikas, ptarmigans, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, mountain lions, bobcats, coyotes, bears, beavers, moose, deer, and elk – visit the Maxwell Park and Hockendorf State Wildlife Areas to see many of these animals wander through

Location

  • Located in Chaffee County, CO – in central Colorado
  • About 123 miles from Denver, CO to Buena Vista, CO
  • The byway runs through the towns of Buena Vista, Poncha Springs, and Salida
  • The byway includes US-24 north of Granite, where it connects to the southern portion of the Top of the Rockies Byway at US-24 and CO-82
  • The byway follows US-24 south through Buena Vista, and continues south on US-285 to US-50 and the town of Poncha Springs
  • The byway then turns east on US-50 to Salida and therein turns northward on CO-291 through Salida’s Historic Downtown
  • It then reconnects with US-285

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Colorado River Headwaters Scenic Byway

 Overview

This beautiful byway drive follows the beginnings of the great Colorado River, taking you past several lakes and reservoirs, pristine forests and ranchlands, and narrow canyons. There is year-round recreation to be enjoyed along the route and plenty of wildlife and fantastic mountain views to behold.

80 miles / 128 km, Grand Lake to Bond, CO

Key Attractions

Colorado River Headwaters Byway Map
  • Fishing, sailing, camping, skiing, snowmobiling, hot springs, and hiking all available along the route – seasonal activities
  • Hot Sulphur Springs Resort offers hot, soothing, mineral water to relax and ease visitors’ ailments – used anciently by Ute Indians, now a fine, modern resort offering lodging, indoor, and outdoor pools
  • Several beautiful lakes (such as Lake Granby, Grand Lake, Shadow Mountain Lake, Williams Fork Reservoir) exist along the river, surrounded by pristine wilderness and fantastic Colorado mountain views
  • The Colorado river itself – visitors are able to see part of the evolution of the West’s greatest river – from small stream to deep current

Location

  • Byway begins in Grand Lake, CO – northern Colorado – and ends near Bond, CO
  • To drive the byway:
    • Begin the drive just to the west side of the Grand Lake Chamber of Commerce building
    • Head southwest along US-34 until you reach US-40
    • At this junction, continue along US-40 through Sulphur Springs to CO-9 (or 6th St in Kremling, CO)
    • Continue southwest along CO-9 until reaching CO-131, the end of the byway
    • 104 miles northwest of Denver, CO; directions from Denver:
    • From 4600 Washington St Denver, CO (N 39.780° W 104.979°), take I-70 west out of Denver
    • Stay to the right of I-70 and merge onto US-40 west
    • Keep on US-40 until you reach the intersection with US-34 
    • Follow US-34 until you reach Grand Lake, CO – the byway starts at the Grand Lake Visitor’s Center – N 40.255° W 105.825°
  • Gas, lodging, shopping, restrooms, and food are available in several locations along the way
  • Camping locations are available in Rocky Mountain National Park, Arapaho National Recreation Area, and Pioneer Park in Hot Sulphur Springs
  • The road between Kremmling and the State Bridge (near Bond) at the end of the byway is not accessible to buses or large RV’s

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Dinosaur Diamond Prehistoric Highway

Overview

Dinosaur Diamond Prehistoric Highway is a multi-state byway that is accessible from various points in both Colorado and Utah. This ancient dinosaur mega-highway offers some of the best museums, collections of fossils and bones, learning and activity centers, and open, active excavations that are still making new discoveries today. Various sites display tracks and bones still unearthed in the ground. Some of the largest, most perplexing creatures have been discovered along this byway, and it is certainly a place for all ages to learn, play, and fulfill a childhood dream of exploring dinosaur country. Come visit and enjoy some of the all-time best dinosaur excavation sites in the world!

480 miles / 772.5 km

Key Attractions

Location

  • 111 miles from Salt Lake City, UT; 250 miles from Denver, CO
  • Driving the byway (Colorado section)
    • Start at the Utah-Colorado border on US-40
    • Turn south onto CO-64 at Dinosaur and continue onto Rangley
    • From Rangley, drive south on SR 139 to Loma
    • From Loma, drive east to Fruita on US-6 and Grand Junction
    • To loop back to the UT section, drive west on I-70 to the UT/CO border, where the Colorado section of the byway ends
  • Driving the byway (Utah section)
    • UT/CO border via I-70
      • The Utah section starts at the UT/CO border on I-70; head west
      • Take exit 212, the eastern Cisco exit, turn left over the Interstate
      • 1 ½ miles west of Cisco, turn left at a three-way junction with UT-128 and head south toward the Colorado River, Castle Valley, and Moab
      • At the intersection with US-191, turn left (south) to reach Moab, UT
    • Moab, UT to Green River, UT
      • Turn right (north) onto US-191 and cross the Colorado River
      • Continue north to Crescent Junction and I-70
      • Take I-70 west past Green River, UT
    • Green River, UT to Price, UT
      • Two miles west of Green River, UT turn north at exit 156 onto US-6/191
      • Drive north towards Price, UT, approximately 60 miles northwest
    • Price, UT to Duchesne, UT
      • From Price, continue north and west on US-6/191 through the town of Helper
      • Four miles north of Helper is where US-6/191 splits; take the right hand turn onto US-191 that runs down over the Price River, the railroad tracks, and around the coal-fired power plant you can see
      • Continue on US-191 for 44 miles up Willow Creek Canyon, up and over Reservation Ridge with a pass at just over 9,000 feet above sea level, and down through Indian Canyon to the town of Duchesne, UT in the Uintah Basin
    • Duchesne, UT to Vernal, UT
      • A few blocks after crossing the Strawberry River, there is a stop sign dividing US-191 from US-40
      • Turn right and drive east on US-40 through Myton at the Duchesne River bridge and then through Roosevelt
      • US-40 continues on into Vernal ending on Main Street
    • Vernal, UT to UT/CO border
      • Take US-40 east for 12 miles to reach Jensen, UT
      • Continue east across the bridge over the Green River
      • Travel 18 miles to UT/CO border where the Utah section of the byway ends
  • Plenty of lodging, food, gas, and camping in various cities

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Flat Tops Trail Scenic Byway

Overview

Flat Tops Trail Scenic Byway, located in the White River Valley in northwestern Colorado, travels along a pristine wilderness area that is a bit off the beaten path. Visitors can enjoy the slower pace of life and some peace and quiet while embarking on some fun adventures. Whether you are looking to experience simply a scenic drive or a magnitude of outdoor recreation, the Flat Tops area has something to offer travelers seeking the natural element.

82 miles from Meeker, CO to Yampa, CO

Key Attractions

  • Hundreds of miles of hiking trails
  • Pristine wilderness and wildlife
  • Prime hunting and fishing
  • Horseback riding
  • 4-wheel-drive routes, snowmobiling, and cross-country skiing
  • Flattops Wilderness area
  • Historic museums in both Meeker and Yampa

Location

  • Located in the center of the northwestern quadrant of Colorado
  • Located between the towns of Meeker and Yampa, CO
    • Begins near Meeker, CO at the junction of Hwy 13 and Country Road 8
    • Follows CR 8 for 82 miles into the town of Yampa, CO
  • Approximately only half of this byway is a paved road
  • Accessible by passenger vehicles during summer season – snow vehicles required during winter months
  • Extreme weather conditions exist at high elevation in the Rocky Mountains – plan accordingly
  • There are NO AMENITIES along this byway, such as gasoline, hotel, and food
  • This byway crosses open rangeland – watch out for livestock on the road, as well as wildlife

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Frontier Pathways Scenic and Historic Byway

Mirroring the paths of Zebulon Pike, Charles Goodnight, Juan Bautista de Anza, Arthur Carhart and Cuerno Verde, Frontier Pathways showcases rugged mountains, carpets of wildflowers, piñon-dotted foothills and clusters of golden aspen. Visitors can experience the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, 22 peaks over 13,000 feet.

Frontier Pathways Byway Map

103 miles / 165.8 km, Pueblo to Westcliffe or Highways 96 & 165, Wetmore to Colorado City

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Gold Belt Tour Scenic and Historic Byway

Connecting six historic Colorado cities, four stunning roads comprise the Gold Belt Tour Scenic and Historic Byway. Whether you are just driving the route, stopping by the historic railway and stagecoach routes, museums, dinosaur, and fossil sites, or enjoying the outdoor recreation along the way – you are sure to see some of Colorado’s best mountain scenery along this relaxing byway.

131 miles / 210 km

Key Attractions

  • Museums located in Cripple Creek, Victor, Cañon City, and Florence offer historical information about the region
  • Florissant Valley – the remains of an ancient lake bed, lush greenery, and expansive views
  • Mountain biking – with fantastic scenery and safe roads with low speed limits
  • High Park Road – located near Pikes Peak, supplies grand views of the mountain ranges surrounding the elevated road
  • Florissant Heritage Museum in Florissant, CO (previously a schoolhouse from 1887-1960) – gives a history of the area starting with the Ute Indians – a member of the National Register of Historic Places
  • Rock climbing – particularly along Shelf Road, where climbs are short but challenging
  • Shelf Road Recreation Area – great for rock climbing, camping, hiking, picnicking, and biking
  • Scenic views of Pikes Peak – one of Colorado’s iconic landmarks, viewable from the byway
  • Historic stagecoach and railway courses, such as the Royal Gorge Route
  • Royal Gorge Suspension Bridge – the highest suspension bridge in the world and the steepest incline railway to the bottom of the gorge
  • Dinosaur Depot and the Garden Park Fossil Area – located just north of Cañon City, tours some of the most important North American fossil discoveries

Location

  • 103 miles from Denver, CO
  • Directions from Denver:
    • Start from the on-ramp to I-25 south out of Denver N 39.740° W 105.010°
    • Take US-24 west in Colorado Springs
    • Stay on US-24 until you reach Florissant, CO where the byway starts N 38.946° W 105.289°
  • Driving directions for the byway:
    • Phantom Canyon Section:
      • The first section of the byway starts in Florence, CO, at the junction of CO 67 and West Main Street
      • From here, head north on CO 67 and continue as it changes to Phantom Canyon Rd
      • At the junction of CO 67 and 4th St. head south on CO 67 to W. Victor Ave, then head west on CO 67 into Cripple Creek
      • In Cripple Creek, head west on E. Carr Ave. and continue as the road becomes Teller County Rd
      • Follow this into Florissant
    • Shelf Road Section:
      • At the junction of CO 67 and Main Street in Florence, drive west on Main Street to Ash St in Brookside
      • In Brookside, drive north on Ash St as it changes to S Reynolds Ave, then to Fremont Dr
      • After the road becomes Fremont Dr, drive west to Field Ave
      • Drive north on Field Ave to Red Canyon Rd and continue north as the road becomes Shelf Rd
      • Continue again as the road changes to Xenia St and continue to CO 67 south of Cripple Creek
    • High Park Section:
      • Start at the junction of Cedar Ave and Ash St in Brookside
      • Drive west on Cedar Ave to Chestnut St and head north
      • Once you reach Elm Ave, drive west to 9th St then drive north to Royal Gorge Blvd
      • Drive southeast on Royal Gorge Blvd to CO 9
      • At CO 9, drive north to High Park Rd
      • Continue north on High Park Rd to County Road 11
      • Drive north on County Rd 11 to County Rd 1 where the byway ends
  • There is lodging, gas, camping, food, and shopping along this byway

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Grand Mesa Scenic and Historic Byway

Overview

Called the “alpine oasis in the sapphire sky,” Grand Mesa Scenic and Historic Byway offers an incredible amount of beauty for any visitor to see. The drive will take you through vast expanses of alpine forest, acres of green meadows, hundreds of pristine lakes and streams, and awesome views of several different mountain ranges. This byway and the area it encompasses has much to offer, no matter what season you choose to visit in.

63 miles / 101.4 km, I-70 to Cedaredge with spur to Lands End

Key Attractions

Grand Mesa Byway Map
  • Grand Mesa National Forest – beautiful, dense forests (very rich and colorful in Autumn), prime fishing and fly-fishing, and hiking
  • Powderhorn Ski Resort – near Mesa, CO
  • Hundreds of lakes, endless alpine forests, and meadows – a prime area for camping, fishing, hiking, exploring, biking, skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling, etc.
  • Lands End Observatory – sits on the edge of Grand Mesa, viewing all 6,000 ft of the valley below and Utah’s La Sal Mountains to the west – located at the end of the byway’s offshoot
  • Land-O-Lakes Overlook – view the 300+ lakes at this stunning overlook
  • Grand Mesa Visitor Center – offers hiking trails, exhibits – located at the junction of CO-65 and Forest Development Rd 121

Location

  • 226 miles from Denver, CO
    • To drive from Denver – start at 4600 Washington St Denver, CO or N 39.780° W 104.979°
    • Take I-70 west
    • Follow I-70 until the beginning of the byway, the junction with CO-65 – N 39.184° W 108.281°
  • Driving the byway:
    • The byways starts at the intersection of I-70 and CO-65, just northeast of Palisades, CO
    • Drive west on CO-65 until it meets CO-330
    • At this junction, continue on CO-65 driving south until it meets F.S. 100 Rd on the western side of the road, which is the beginning of the westward offshoot to the byway
    • Follow F.S. 100 Rd for approximately 1 mile before driving northwest on A. Rd for approximately 10 miles – this will take you through much of Grand Mesa National Forest
    • After you see enough of the forest or reach the end of the offshoot, head back and continue south along CO-65 until you reach Cedaredge, the end of the byway
  • Lodging is available between Mesa and Cedaredge
  • Gas, restrooms, camping (may have fees, no RV or dump hookups), and shopping are available along the route
  • Grand Mesa Visitors Center is handicap accessible

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Los Caminos Antiguos Scenic Byway

Overview

The Los Caminos Antiguos Scenic Byway stretches around the Great Sand Dunes National Park and winds its way down to the state border with New Mexico. Its name means “the ancient roads,” and was given for its part of the 16th-century Spanish territorial expansion. The San Luis Valley that the byway traverses is filled with some of Colorado’s oldest and richest history. Visitors can explore the sand dunes and then continue along and explore the Hispanic culture and sites all throughout the valley.

129 miles – approximately 3 hours driving time/ 4 hours recommended for sightseeing

Key Attractions

  • Great Sand Dunes National Park – North America’s tallest sand dunes, hundreds of feet high, stretching miles
  • San Luis – Colorado’s oldest surviving community
  • Our Lady of Guadalupe – Colorado’s oldest church
  • Fort Garland – one of Colorado’s oldest and first military posts
  • Historic adobe structures and missions, museums, and galleries
  • Panoramic views all throughout the San Luis Valley

Location

  • Located in the center of southern Colorado
  • The byway starts in Alamosa, CO and travels north, then west into Great Sand Dunes National Park, then southerly out of the park – it ends at the state line of Colorado and New Mexico

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

San Juan Skyway Scenic Byway

Overview

Whether you take one day to drive sections of this beautiful byway, or 3 days to intimately explore and venture to stops and close destinations, San Juan Skyway will provide everything a traveler is looking for, from stunning views of green forests and red rock mesas, to both ancient and modern historic locations. Road-bike along the byway, camp near San Juan National Forest, hike to Mesa Verde, relax in hot springs, ride the narrow-gauge railroad, or just enjoy a beautiful drive along some of Colorado’s most varying landscapes.

233 miles / 375 km

Key Attractions

San Juan Skyway Map
  • Mesa Verde National Park, near the cities of Mancos and Cortez, along the byway – an ancient city of cliff dwellings, rock art, and artifacts that belong to the ancestral Pueblo Indians, or the Anasazi people
  • Historic mining and railway locations – tourists may take train rides from Durango to Silverton, CO
  • Beautiful contrasts between the high mountain peaks (the San Juan Mountains), forests, and low meadows and valleys  – particularly beautiful in the Autumn months
  • Bridal Veil Falls, CO, overlooking Telluride, CO – 365 ft. waterfall with a wide stream cascading over a rocky cliff face and surrounded by beautiful forest
  • Fantastic mountain views for camping, fishing, hiking, exploring, skiing, driving, and world-class, challenging biking
  • Five million acres of wilderness in the San Juan National Forest and Uncompahgre National Forest

Location

  • Located in the southwest of Colorado; 336 miles southwest of Denver, CO
  • Driving the byway (in a circle)
    • San Juan Skyway Scenic Byway begins in Durango, CO, at the junction of US-160 and US-550
    • Drive north on US-550 and continue on as it turns to Main Ave.
    • Continue north to Million Dollar Hwy in Silverton, CO
    • Drive northwest on Million Dollar Hwy to Main St. in Quray, CO
    • Head north to Sherman St, then head to west to CO-145, northwest of Placerville, CO
    • Drive southeast on CO-145 to Dolores, CO, then drive west to Mancos Rd.
    • Head east to US-550 in Durango, CO, where the byway ends

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Silver Thread Scenic and Historic Byway

Overview

Silver Thread Scenic Byway runs along Highway 149, through Colorado’s historic mining and ranch land. The Creede and Lake City areas offer authentic views of their pastoral culture and history. Visitors have multiple activities to choose from, should they want to step out from their scenic drive. Be sure to catch the five snowy peaks over 14,000 feet – the same unforgiving area that lost explorer John C. Fremont a third of his men, and caused Alfred Packer to cannibalize his companions during two different fatal winter expeditions.

117 miles

Key Attractions

  • Gunnison and Rio Grande National Forests
  • La Garita, Wminuche, and Powderhorn Wilderness Areas
  • Old mining camps and structures – gold and silver mines, boomtowns
  • North Clear Creek Falls
  • Slumgullion earth slide
  • Uncompahgre Peak – with its shark-like fin
  • Five of Colorado’s mountains that are 14,000+ feet in elevation
  • Windy Point Overlook – overlooks all five “fourteeners”
  • Wheeler Geological Area
  • Creede Underground Mining Museum
  • Creede Repertory Theater – popular theater open May through September
  • Wolf Creek Ski Area
  • Dude ranches
  • Naturally hot springs

Location

  • Located in southwestern Colorado
  • Starting at Blue Mesa Reservoir and Hwy 50, follow SR 149 south from that junction for 117 miles until the end of the byway at South Fork
  • There are amenities and camping along this byway

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Top of the Rockies Scenic Byway

Overview

Top of the Rockies Scenic Byway journeys along some of Colorado’s most scenic wilderness, with elevations rarely measuring below a staggering 9,000 feet. However, that is not all the byway boasts – the entire byway is filled with blue, snow-capped peaks hovering over lush green valleys and canyons. Travelers will cross the Continental divide twice along this route, as well as parallel several rivers. Whether you come for the outdoor recreation, abundant wildlife, or historic mining destinations, everybody can find something magical to see along this unique route.

115 miles / 185 km, Copper Mountain and Minturn to Aspen

Key Attractions

Top of the Rockies Byway Map
  • Snow-capped peaks, green meadows, lush, narrow canyons, and sparkling blue lakes
  • Historic railroads, mining towns, like Leadville, and ranches, like Escondido Ranch – located near Red Cliff, CO
  • Holy Cross Wilderness and several national forests – spectacular scenery – blue ridges over green trees or meadows, lakes, and trails
  • Fishing, hiking, biking, camping, wildlife viewing, horseback riding, and ATV trails
  • Wildlife includes bighorn sheep, prong horn antelope, red tail foxes,
  • Picturesque wildflowers in the warmer months
  • Some of the highest peaks in Colorado and the Rocky Mountains – including Mount Elbert, Twin Peaks, Mount Hope, and Quail Mountain
  • Cross-country skiing (Mayflower Gulch is a prime spot) and skiing/boarding (Copper Mountain, Vail, etc.)
  • Golfing (Mt. Massive Golf Course, the highest golf course in North America)

Location

  • 101 miles from Denver, CO
  • Located in the western-middle section of Colorado
  • Byway consists of three arms branching from Leadville, CO, with endpoints at Aspen, CO, I-70 (just past Minturn, CO), and Eagle’s Nest Wilderness Area(just past Copper Mountain, CO)
  • Driving the byway:
    • Leadville to Aspen
    • From Leadville, drive south on US-24
    • Turn west onto CO-82 (Independence Pass Road) in Balltown, CO
    • Continue on CO-82 to Aspen, CO (or just past to Maroon Creek Bridge)
    • This arm of the byway ends here
  • Leadville to I-70
  • From Leadville, drive north on US-24 towards Minturn, CO
  • Continue past Minturn, CO to I-70
  • This arm of the byway ends here
  • Leadville to Eagle’s Nest Wilderness Area
  • From Leadville, drive north on CO-91
  • Pass the Copper Mountain Ski Resort to the border of Eagle’s Nest Wilderness Area
  • This arm of the byway ends here
    • There is gas, lodging, food, shopping, and camping along this byway
    • This byway provides several options for the handicapped, including the Braille Trail at Independence Pass, located on Hwy 82 at mile marker 54
    • Highway 82 is a narrow road and not very conducive to biking, however, there are paralleling foot/bike trails near the city of Aspen, CO, and more bike-friendly stretches of road near the cities of Twin Lakes and Leadville, CO

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Tracks Across Borders Scenic Byway

Tracks Across Borders Byway runs along the Colorado/New Mexico border between Durango, Colorado and Chama, New Mexicotqc. It provides access to Native American cultures, breathtaking scenery, vital communities, and ancient sites.

Total length: 125 miles
Total driving time: 4.5 hours

Portions of the byway are unpaved gravel but suitable for travel in a family car.

The byway roughly follows the tracks of the nation’s largest narrow gauge railroad
system – the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad (D&RG). It links the D&RG with the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic RR. Both are remaining parts of the San Juan Extension, built in the early 1880’s.

The byway skirts Chaco ruins, Chimney Rock National Monument and Navajo Lake, which is a major recreation area. It provides access to early logging, ranching and farming areas.

The byway is a gem well worth driving.

www.tracksacrossborders.com

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Trail Ridge/Beaver Meadow Scenic Byway

Overview

Producing some of Colorado’s most picturesque and iconic scenery, Trail Ridge Scenic Byway takes explorers along the ridges of the Rocky Mountains in Rocky Mountain National Park. While traveling the byway and stopping at the many lookout points, visitors will see lush greenery, snow-capped mountains, wildlife, and beautiful wildflowers. Popular recreation includes driving, hiking, fishing, camping, horseback riding (on certain trails), and even biking if can brave the narrow roads, steep ledges, and cold temperatures – the climate found here at high elevations is similar to the climate of the Arctic Circle.

48 miles / 77.2 km, Estes Park to Grand Lake

Key Attractions

Trail Ridge/Beaver Meadow Byway Map
  • Bear Lake – a small picturesque lake surrounded by towering trees and snow-capped cliffs
  • Forest Canyon Overlook – overlooks Forest Canyon, Hayden Gorge, and Gorge Lakes
  • Continental Divide – view the amazing separation of two separate climates and ecosystems
  • Continental Divide Scenic Trail – crosses with the byway near Miners Pass – this trail runs 3,100 miles from the Canada/Montana border to the Mexico/New Mexico border – this trail offers grand views of the Rocky Mountains and the spectacular scenery around them
  • Rocky Mountain National Park – scenic views of lush green meadows and forests, high mountain peaks, snow-capped mountains, wildflowers, and even wind-twisted trees up at the high-elevation peaks
  • Over 280 species of birds – named a Global Important Bird Area

Location

  • North-central Colorado
  • 70 miles northeast of Denver, CO
  • Driving the byway
    • The byway starts with a loop (US-34 & US-36 meet at Estes Park and then again at Deer Ridge Junction) and then the main arm continues to the end of the byway (US-34)
    • Start at the intersection of W. Elkhorn Ave. and Moraine Ave. in Estes Park, CO
    • Travelers can take the north portion of the loop first, or the south portion first
      • North Portion:
        • Drive West on W. Elkhorn Ave. to Fall River Rd.
        • Continue west to S. Navy Hill to complete the loop
      • South Portion:
        • From the intersection of W. Elkhorn Ave. and Moraine Ave. in Estes Park, travel south on Moraine Ave. to Park Entrance Rd.
        • Continue west to Fall River Rd.
    • Continue on US-34 to the end of the byway, Grand Lake, CO
  • Gas is only located at the ends of the byways, in Estes Park and Grand Lake
  • Lodging, camping, shopping, and food are located along this byway
  • Longs Peak, Timber Creek, and Moraine Park campgrounds are open year-round
  • The byway travels through Rocky Mountain National Park; there is a park entrance fee
  • Backcountry permits are available at the Kawuneeche Visitor Center
  • Parts of this byway and Rocky Mountain National Park are closed from the end of October until the Friday of Memorial Day weekend

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Unaweep/Tabeguache Scenic and Historic Byway

Overview

The Unaweep/ Tabeguache Scenic and Historic Byway is full of spectacular sites, rich mining and ranch history, and striking contrasts of color and landscape. Visitors can enjoy beautiful vast views, historic sites and museums, and the outdoor recreation along the way.

133 miles; 3 hours driving time

Key Attractions

  • San Miguel River Environmental Area
  • Unaweep Seep – a hillside comprised of a wet sedge, marsh, and seep ecosystem – a large population of wetland plants and insects are found here
  • Dolores and San Miguel Rivers
  • Driggs Mansion – a 6 bedroom home that was built by the Driggs family in the early 1900’s – built to cultivate the desert area establish water rights
  • West Creek Picnic Area
  • Gateway Colorado Auto Museum
  • Nature Conservancy’s Tabeguache Creek Preserve
  • Hanging Flume – perhaps the riskiest and lofty plans in all of mining history
  • Dominguez and Escalante Expedition Historic Marker
  • Nature Conservancy San Miguel Canyon Preserve
  • Gunnison and Dolores Rivers
  • Wildlife – such as the raptor, bald eagle, peregrine, bear, mountain lion, bobcat, elk, mule deer, and coyote

Location

  • Located in western Colorado; 15 miles south of Grand Junction, CO – near the Colorado/Utah border
  • The Unaweep/ Tabeguache Scenic and Historic Byway is made up of Highways 141 and 145
  • The byway runs from the towns of Whitewater, CO to Placerville, CO
  • If driving from north to south, between the towns of Naturita and Norwood, take Hwy 145 southerly – do not continue on Hwy 141 in a westerly direction
  • If driving from south to north, between the towns of Norwood and Naturita, take Hwy 141 northerly from Hwy 145

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

West Elk Scenic and Historic Byway

Overview

The West Elk Scenic and Historic Byway was described by a forest ranger as “the closest you can come to a wilderness experience in a passenger car.” Visitors are likely to see an abundance of wildlife, scenic and rugged views of some of Colorado’s most iconic mountain scenes, and quite a few places that tempt you to step out of your car to explore. This magnificent landscape has been home to generations of Native Americans, such as the Utes, early White settlers, ranchers, and miners. This byway is rich in history and culture, and abundant in natural beauty and recreation.

205 miles

Key Attractions

  • An abundance of wildlife – such as bears, elk, deer, bighorn sheep, coyotes, and eagles
  • Three wilderness areas (Hunter-Fryingpan Wilderness Area, Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness Area, and West Elk Wilderness Area)
  • Thousands of acres of national forest (Grand Mesa National Forest, White River National Forest, Gunnison National Forest
  • Several state parks located in close proximity (Vega State Park, Sweitzer Lake State Park, Crawford State Park, Paonia State Park,
  • Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park
  • Curecanti National Recreation Area – extremely popular fishing, boating, wind sailing, hiking, climbing, camping, picnicking, backpacking, snowmobiling, snowshoeing, ice fishing, cross-country skiing, backcountry skiing, etc.
  • Crested Butte National Historic District
  • San Juan Scenic Overlook
  • Extremely beautiful scenery – wildflowers, alpine trees and greenery, narrow canyon walls, summits and peaks, majestic mountains, and crystal clear rivers
  • Historic mining and ranching communities and relics

Locations

  • Located in central-western Colorado; approximately 30 miles from Aspen, CO to Carbondale, CO
  • Driving the byway:
    • Starting in Gunnison, CO, drive north of Colorado Hwy 135 toward Crested Butte
    • Then drive west over Kebler Pass (a dirt road usually open from Memorial Day through early November) to Hwy 133 south through Paonia
    • In Hotchkiss, take Hwy 92 east toward Crawford
    • Hwy 92 ends at US Hwy 50 at the Blue Mesa Dam, where you will turn east and drive back to Gunnison
  • There are amenities such as gasoline, food, and lodging located along this byway

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Trail of the Ancients Scenic Byway

Overview

The Trail of the Ancients Scenic Byway wraps around some of the most unique and diverse landscapes in the U.S. The Colorado portion of the byway leads you through several iconic locations, including Mesa Verde National Park, a large ancient group of cliff dwellings nestled into the sandstone cliffs. Visitors have plenty of parks and trails to step off onto to explore the view the beautiful, expansive area. Or, if you are just driving the byway and taking in the experience from your vehicle, the desert views and communities along the road will not disappoint.

480 miles / 772 km total for Colorado and Utah

Key Attractions

Trail of the Ancients Byway Map
  • Mesa Verde National Park – a large array of dwellings and kivas are available to view and walk around
    • Cliff Palace at Mesa Verde is the largest Indian cliff dwelling in North America
    • Balcony House – intact cliff dwelling remains offer a view into a different world, built using mainly sandstone, mortar, and wooden beams
  • Indian Arts and Western Culture Festival – held at Mesa Verde annually
    • Indian Art Market featuring local Native American artists
  • Ute Mountain Tribal Park – features ancestral Puebloan petroglyphs as well as historic Ute Indian petroglyphs
  • Four Corners – the only point in the United States where four boundaries meet
  • Hovenweep National Monument – UT/CO border, one hour west of Cortez, CO – visit Ancestral Puebloan sites and the unique D-shaped structure of towers located at this monument
  • Scenery depicting vast desert landscapes, cedar covered mountains, and unique desert wildlife
  • View the remnants of tough geologic action, through wind and water
  • Camping, biking, and hiking are the main recreational activities along this byway

Location

  • Located in the Four Corners region of southwest Colorado and southeast Utah
  • 287 miles southeast of Salt Lake City, UT; 384 miles southwest of Colorado Spring, CO; 251 miles northwest of Albuquerque, NM
  • Driving the Colorado section of the byway: 
    • Beginning at Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado on US-160, travel west 8 miles to the intersection of US-160 and CO-145 where the byway forks and you can go north or south
      • Northern Section:
      • Turn north (right) and follow CO-145 for 9 miles to the intersection of CO-145 and CO-184
      • Follow CO-184 west 8 miles to its intersection with US-491 in Colorado
      • Turn right (north) and follow US-491 for 9 miles to its intersection with Montezuma County Road CC
      • Turn left (west) and follow this route for 4 miles to its intersection with CR-CC and Montezuma County Road 10
      • Turn left (south) and follow CR-10 to the Colorado-Utah state line and the beginning of Trail of the Ancients – Utah, approximately 19 miles
      • Southern Section
      • At the intersection of US 160/491 and 145, continue on US 160/491
      • Travel 40 miles southwest to the Four Corners National Monument in Utah and the terminus of the byway
      • Before the Four Corners Monument, the byway also heads northwest, on CO-41, 10 miles to Trail of the Ancients – UT
  • In Colorado, visitors centers, gas, lodging, and food are located in Cortez and Dolores, CO
  • Camping and restroom locations are located along this byway
  • Fees may exist for entrance to parks
  • Plenty of lodging, food, gas, and camping in various cities

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

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Nevada

https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/byways/states/NV

Lake Tahoe – Eastshore Drive Scenic Byway

Overview

Lake Tahoe – Eastshore Drive Scenic Byway has it all – prime views of the Sierra Nevada’s behind the crystal blue lake, white sandy beaches, pine forests, grassy meadows, beautiful blue skies and awe inspiring sunsets. Pair this with the abundant summer and winter activities, and you have a wonderful playground for adults and children of all ages. Take your chances at wind-surfing, parasailing, boating, fishing, swimming, hiking, camping, wildlife viewing, golf, sledding and skiing at nearby facilities, or even sleigh rides during winter in Stateline, NV. This scenic drive has earned the name, “the most beautiful drive in America,” and visitors who come experience Lake Tahoe’s scenery will experience first-hand why.

28 miles / 45.1 km

Key Attractions

Lake Tahoe Byway Map
  • Pony Express Trail – Lake Tahoe Scenic Byway is part of this historic route
  • Washoe Indians home and center for some of their most sacred grounds
  • Over 30 different golf courses along the byway
  • Incline Village, NV – enjoy upscale lodging, restaurants, and shopping (visitors can even enjoy Christmas stores filled with holiday decorations and ornaments)
  • Cave Rock – great place to rent boats and enjoy the sandy beaches
  • Zephyr Cove – deeper waters ideal for water sports and boating
  • Sand Harbor – leisurely fishing spot (primarily rainbow trout) and safe spot for family swimming
  • Gondola rides – just past the California state border after passing Stateline, NV
  • Mormon Station State Historic Park

Location

  • 36 miles southwest from Reno, NV; 109 miles northeast from Sacramento, CA
  • Located near California’s Tahoe National Forest, Eldorado National Forest, and Granite Chief Wilderness, and located just a few miles away from Nevada’s capitol city, Carson City
  • Driving the byway:
    • Start at the north end of Lake Tahoe, in Crystal Bay, NV on NV-28
    • Drive south for approximately 13.2 miles – here the byway merges with US-50
    • Continue traveling south on US-50 for about 12 miles until you enter the town of Stateline, NV, where the byway ends

Lodging, food, gas, and shopping are found along the byway – the largest selection in Incline Village and Zephyr Cove

Las Vegas Strip Scenic Byway

Overview

Las Vegas Strip Scenic Byway is one of America’s most iconic images. It is the United State’s only “Nighttime Byway,” and the neon lights and signs that light up the Las Vegas Strip after dark remains one of the most awe-inspiring, man-made sights. Visitors can take a drive or stroll down Las Vegas Boulevard and enjoy the mega-hotels and casinos, entertainment around every corner, historic museums and buildings, and the good-old glitz and glam of Las Vegas.

4.5 miles / 7.2 km, Las Vegas, NV

Key Attractions

Las Vegas Strip Byway Map
  • ·Some of the world’s largest and most luxurious hotels and casinos, including the MGM Grand, the Luxor, the Circus Circus, the Riviera, the Bellagio, the Flamingo, the Excalibur, the Treasure Island, the Mirage, the Stratosphere, the Palms, the New York New York, the Mandalay Bay, etc.
  • ·Outdoor entertainment and thrills – from roller coaster rides (such as the Stratosphere coasters and the New York New York coaster) to water fountains and light shows (like those at the Bellagio and Mirage) to the giant constructed volcano that spews fireballs (located at the Mirage Hotel & Casino) and the smaller replica of the Statue of Liberty (located at the New York New York)
  • ·Shows and entertainment – visitors can experience fun sights, such as the 1.6 million gallon aquarium at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino that holds sharks, jellyfish, crocodiles, and thousands of other fish, the “Tournament of Kings” show at the Excalibur Hotel & Casino, which features a show of combat and sword-play, and the pirate show at the Treasure Island Hotel & Casino
  • ·World class golf clubs – the Las Vegas Strip Scenic Byway is located within minutes of numerous golf clubs and resorts
  • ·Museums & centers – Las Vegas is home to several educational centers and museums, including the Natural History Museum, the Nevada State Museum, the Bellagio’s Gallery of Fine Arts, the Atomic Testing Museum, the Marjorie Barrick Museum, the Neon Museum and Bone Yard, and even the Pinball Hall of Fame

Location

  • ·Las Vegas, NV; located 2.8 miles from McCarran International Airport
  • ·Located near Fremont Street in Las Vegas, Lake Mead, Lake Powell, and Mesquite, AZ
  • ·Driving the byway:
    • Byway begins at the intersection of Russell Rd. and Las Vegas Blvd.
    • Follow Las Vegas Blvd. north for 4.5 miles
    • The byway ends at the intersection of Las Vegas Blvd. and Sahara Ave.
Pyramid Lake Scenic Byway

Overview

The Pyramid Lake experience offers unique attractions, setting itself apart from a traditional lake destination. Boating, fishing, camping, and hiking are all still on the menu for the area, but visitors have a unique opportunity to enjoy one of the largest bird refuge areas in North America – home to 8,000-10,000 White American Pelicans, and a large array of very unique rock formations – Tufa rocks, including the lake’s namesake formation – Pyramid Rock. The beautiful, colorful lake and the byway are located within the Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation, and the destination is sponsored by the Paiute people.

30.2 miles/ 48.6 km, Fernley to Sutcliffe

Key Attractions

Pyramid Lake Byway Map
  • Pyramid Rock – large pyramid-shaped rock formation that juts out of the lake – the area is home to many unique rock formations, the pyramid being the most famous
  • Tufa formations surrounding the lake – large rock formations, shaped out of calcium carbonate deposits that result from precipitation over hot springs – the shapes of these rocks are very interesting and rare, beckoning visitors to imagine specific shapes out of them
  • Anaho Island – a small island on Pyramid Lake, viewable from the shore, home to thousands of American White Pelicans – visitors can use binoculars to help see the beautiful birds
  • Sutcliffe Marina area – one of the best spots for visitors to spot both the famous pelicans on Anaho Island and the Peregrine Falcons that share the island – use binoculars or the birding scope at the marina
  • Paiute Tribe Museum and Visitor Center, Nixon, NV – visitors can learn about the history and culture of the Paiute people and the surrounding area, and view the displays of pre-historic tribal artifacts
  • Numana and Marble Bluff Fish Hatcheries, located on State Hwy 447 – learn about the endangered fish being protected and the habitats of the lake
  • Truckee River – fish or take a scenic walk along the river – particularly beautiful during Autumn
  • Pyramid Lake – the lake is famous for its stunning image as a crystal blue refuge in the middle of the hot Nevada desert, cutthroat trout fishing, boating, sandy beaches, and unique rock formations and surroundings

Location

  • 30 miles northeast of Reno, NV
  • Located near Humboldt Tolyabe National Forest, Lahontan Reservoir and State Recreation Area, Lake Tahoe, Carson City, California state line, and Reno’s National Automobile Museum, Nevada Museum of Art, Fisherman Planetarium, Bowling Stadium, and Arboretum
  • Driving the byway:
    • The byway consist of one main arm (State Hwy 447), one branch (State Hwy 446), and one small branch (State Hwy 445)
    • Start the byway at the intersection of Washeim St. and Main St. in Wadsworth, NV
    • Drive north on Washeim St. – it turns into State Hwy 447
    • Continue on State Hwy 447 until the junction with State Hwy 446 – here you can continue the northern extension on 447 or the northwest extension (446)
      • Northern arm:
        • Continue on State Hwy 447 through Nixon, NV, where that section of the byway ends
      • Northwestern arm:
        • Drive northwest on State Hwy 446 towards Sutcliffe, NV
          • State Hwy 446 runs into State Hwy 445 – turn southwest on 445 to drive to the Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation – that extension of the byway ends there
        • Continue on 446 until it meets Hardscrabble Canyon Rd. – where that section of the byway ends
  • Day-use permit required for camping, hiking, fishing, swimming, picnicking and driving off-road
    • Permits available at the Pyramid Lake Marina, the Pyramid Lake Store in Sutcliffe, NV, and the I-80 Smoke Shop/ Union 76 gas station in Wadsworth, NV
  • Lodging, food, phone, and restrooms are available along this highway
  • The most convenient location for gasoline along this highway is in Wadsworth, NV
  • Campgrounds are located at Dayton State Park and the Lahontan State Recreation Area

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New Mexico

https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/byways/states/NM

Billy the Kid Trail Scenic Byway

Overview

 Billy the Kid Trail Scenic byway loops through the beautiful scenery of Lincoln National Forest, the Ruidoso River, and the Sierra Blancas, giving travelers stunning views of green pine forests, grassy plains, snow-capped peaks, and blooming wildflowers at the banks of a river. Recreation is abundant alongside the famous western attractions, whether it is simply driving or hiking, fishing, biking, or horseback riding.

 84 miles / 135.2 km loop, Ruidoso to Hondo

 Key Attractions

Billy the Kid Trail Map
  • Billy the Kid Visitor Center – located at 791 Hwy-70 West in Ruidoso Downs – visitor information (visitors can also call 575-378-5318 for information)
  • Ruidoso River and Sierra Blanca Mountains – beautiful during all the seasons, especially spring during wildflower season
  • Coe Ranch, Hondo, NM – visit the ranch that employed Billy the Kid during the Lincoln County War
  • Frequent festivities celebrating the West, such as the Cowboy Symposium, rodeos, parades, etc.
  • Hubbard Museum of the American West, Ruidoso Downs, NM – exhibits on the horse and the animals’ contribution to the American West
  • Fort Stanton Reservation – view historic sites that were home to Native American battles, the Civil War (including the famous “Buffalo Soldiers,” 9th Calvary), World War II, US Marine Hospital, and the comings and goings of western personalities like Kit Carson, Billy the Kid, and General “Black Jack” Pershing – enjoy outdoor recreation like horseback riding, hiking, and camping
  • Fort Stanton Cave – the most famous cave of a series of 12 caves in the Fort Stanton Reservation
  • Ruidoso Downs Race Track, located at 1461 Hwy-70 E Ruidoso Downs, Nm – world’s richest quarter horse race, The All-American Futurity
  • Ski Apache, located on NM-532, east off of NM-48 (north of Ruidoso) – great skiing, owned and operated by the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe
  • Smokey Bear Museum, 102 Smokey Bear Blvd Capitan, NM – visit the museum that is all about Smokey Bear, America’s symbol to prevent wildfires
  • Lincoln Monument, Lincoln, NM – visit several museums and historic sites that present the history of the town, named after the U.S. president, and the dealings of its famous residents, such as Billy the Kid, Susan “Cattle Queen of New Mexico” McSween, Alexander McSween, etc.

Location

  • 170 miles southeast of Albuquerque, NM; 111 miles northeast of Las Cruces, NM
  • Located in south-central New Mexico
  • Driving the byway:
    • Begin the byway in Ruidoso, NM, and follow NM-48 southeast to Hwy 70
    • Take Hwy 70 northeast to Hwy 380, in Hondo
    • Drive Hwy 380 northwest until the junction with NM-220
    • At the junction, take a small detour south through Fort Stanton and end up at the junction with NM-48
    • Return to the junction of Hwy 380 and NM-220
    • Continue to drive along Hwy 380 to Capitan
    • At the junction of Hwy 380 and NM-48 in Capitan, turn left onto NM-48 and drive south
    • Continue south on NM-48 until you reach Ruidoso, the end of the byway loop
El Camino Real National Scenic Byway

Overview

 Drive along El Camino Real De Tierra Adentro (The Royal Road of the Interior Land) and see a land rich in culture, history, and scenery. First traveled by Don Juan de Onate in 1598, the route provided news, supplies and travel to the first capital of the New World. Visitors today can enjoy viewing ancient pueblos, and locals using ancient techniques for creating arts and crafts, Spanish ruins, ancient ancestral Puebloan and Spanish petroglyphs, beautiful mountain and desert scenery, and the dazzling larger cities of New Mexico – Santa Fe and Albuquerque. Enjoy driving, hiking, biking, camping, and many more activities on this scenic and iconic stretch of historic land.

 299 miles / 481.2 km, Okay Owingeh to New Mexico/Texas/Mexico boarder

 Key Attractions

El Camino Real Byway Map
  • Pojoaque Pueblo and the Poeh Cultural Center – information center, Pueblo art and cultural exhibits, traditional Indian dances on weekends, large Indian arts and crafts shop
  • Santa Clara Pueblo – guided and self-guided tours to view the pueblo
  • Nambe Pueblo – Buffalo Tours offer guided tours to view the buffalo herd located there – young Buffalo Dancers will perform upon advanced request
  • Misión and Bond House Museums – located in Española – museum and tours
  • Large New Mexico cities, Albuquerque and Santa Fe
  • Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge – Bosque del Apache, NM
  • Beautiful mountain scenery, such as the Organ Mountains and the Sandia Mountains – visitors can take a steep tram ride up to the top of Sandia Peak
  • The mix of Spanish, Indian, and Mexican culture throughout cities in New Mexico
  • Petroglyph National Monument – view ancient rock art that tells the stories of ancient Native Americans – about 25,000 symbols, some thought to be created as early as 3,000 years ago, others dated between AD 1300 and AD 1650 by some of the Spanish settlers
    • View the famous Kokopelli symbol – the iconic, hunch-backed flute player – used often in Southwestern and Puebloan art
    • Enjoy the geologically interesting landscape, complete with 5 volcanic cones and an expansive basalt escarpment that dominates the landscape

Location

  • The byway runs through Santa Fe, New Mexico; it covers most of the length of the center of New Mexico, running primarily north-south from the east-central top of the state to the west-central bottom of the state
  • Driving the byway:
    • Beginning at the San Juan Pueblo (north of Santa Fe), take NM-291/NM-74 to NM-68 – travel south on NM-68
    • Turn east onto Fairview Lane and drive for approximately 1 mile
    • At the intersection of McCurdy Road (NM-583) and Fairview Lane, drive south for approximately 1.5 miles
    • At the junction with NM-76, drive west until the junction with NM-106 (approximately 0.5 miles) – continue driving south
    • After approximately 7 miles, past Pojoaque Pueblo, take US-84/285 south for 25 miles into Santa Fe
    • From US-84/285, exit to Guadalupe Street
    • From Guadalupe Street, turn left on to W San Francisco St, right onto Don Gaspar Ave, right on W Alameda St, and then left on Agua Fria St/NM-22/NM-588
    • Continue southwest until the junction with NM-284
    • Take NM-284 until turning right onto E I-25 Frontage Rd
    • From E I-25 Frontage Rd, take on ramp to I-25/US Hwy 85
    • Exit on to NM-16
    • Follow NM-16 and exit on to NM-22 driving south
    • From NM-22, exit on to Indn Service Route 88 going west
    • Exit on to Indn Service Route 84 and follow road to NM-313
    • Take NM-313 through Bernalillo
    • Follow NM-313 as it turns into 4th St NW/NM-47 near Albuquerque
    • Take 4th St NW south
    • Follow road and make a right on Marquette Ave. NW, a left on 5th St. NW, a left on to Central Ave. SW, and a right back on to NM-313/4th St SW
    • Continue on route and exit on to NM-314 going west
    • Continue south on route as it turns into Isleta Blvd.
    • Follow road and exit onto NM-147
    • Follow NM-147 until you get on to NM-47 near Isleta Village Proper
    • Continue on NM-47 until the NM-304 exit near Belen
    • Stay on NM-304 until US-60, and then take US-60 west to Bernardo
    • In Bernardo, drive to I-25 and head towards Alamillo and San Acacia
    • Exit on to Alamillo Rd. and turn right on to I-25 Frontage Rd
    • Follow I-25 Frontage Rd and then exit to NM-408
    • Follow NM-408 and take on-ramp to I-25 going south at Escondida
    • Drive to California St./US Hwy 60 and follow road to State Hwy 1
    • Follow State Hwy 1 to on-ramp for I-25
    • Follow I-25 south to off-ramp to NM-181
    • Follow NM-181 to Truth or Consequences where you will get on Date St.
    • Follow this street to Main Street, and then go to Broadway
    • Follow Broadway to Williamsburg
    • Take NM-187 from Williamsburg to Hatch, and then take NM-185 from Hatch to Las Cruces
    • Next, take NM-188 (Valley Drive) to Avenida de Mesilla, and follow this street to Mesilla
    • Take NM-28 from Mesilla to Canutillo, and then take NM-273 from Canutillo to New Mexico/Texas border
    • The byway ends at the New Mexico/Texas border
Geronimo Trail Scenic Byway

Overview

Visitors can drive along this scenic byway and participate in numerous recreational opportunities, along with visiting the historic sites of the Apaches and Geronimo – even soaking in the same hot mineral springs used by Geronimo and his warriors. Tour the byway and behold different views, from desert lakes to majestic, forested mountains. View the freedom and independence of the land that the Apache tribes, and Geronimo, loved so much.

154 miles / 247.8 km, San Lorenzo to Truth or Consequences to Beaverhead

Key Attractions

Geronimo Trail Map
  • Biking – NM-152 along the byway is part of the southern Bike Centennial route across the United States – cycling endurance races are held on NM-152 across the Black Range over Emory Pass
  • Boating – Elephant Butte Lake – the Rio Grande Sailing Club and the Southwest Dragboat Association hold frequent tournaments and events, and there are two annual boat parades: the Fly Freedom’s Flag during the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend and the Parade of Lights during the second Saturday in December
  • Camping – over 300 developed campsites exist along and surrounding the byway – located in Gila National Forest and the three surrounding New Mexico State Parks
  • Fishing – Caballo Lake, Elephant Butte Lake, the Rio Grande, and the small streams and tributaries surrounding make excellent fishing, particularly for Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout, Large and Small Mouth Bass, Channel Catfish, and Flathead Catfish
  • Golfing – 2 golf courses located right along the byway in Truth or Consequences’ Municipal Golf Course, and Sierra del Rio Golf Course at Turtleback Mountain Resort
  • Hiking – hundreds of different hiking trails along the byway, particularly the 22 miles along the Continental Divide Trail that runs through the Aldo Leopold Wilderness – accessible from Hwy 59 near Beaverhead or from the Rocky Canyon Campground near San Lorenzo
  • Bird-watching – Percha Dam State Park, home to the education event, Migration Sensation, every spring – over 337 bird species located in Gila
  • Visitor Center, 211 Main Street Truth or Consequences – visitors can learn about Geronimo and the history of the area of this byway
  • Museums:
    • Black Range Museum – Hillsboro
    • Geronimo Springs Museum, Truth or Consequences
    • Percha Bank Museum, Kingston
    • Pioneer Store Museum, Chloride (a spur just off of NM-52 near Winston)
    • Veterans Memorial Park, Truth or Consequences

Location

  • 150 miles south of Albuquerque, NM; 150 north of El Paso, TX
  • Located in the center of the southwest quadrant of the state of New Mexico
  • Driving the byway:
    • The byway starts in Truth or Consequences, NM – with two branches going north and south
    • The northern branch
      • From Third Street, at the only stoplight in town, turn right onto NM-51 and follow it to the junction with NM-179
      • Dam Site spur: continue on NM-51 to NM-177
      • Drive until you see the brown sign that says “Dam Site”
      • Return on NM-51 for two miles, to the junction of NM-179, and turn right toward the city of Elephant Butte (it is an additional two miles to reach the junction of NM-195)
      • Turn left to go the Elephant Butte State Park and the city of Elephant Butte – follow NM-195 northwest for four and a half miles until it intersects with NM-181
      • Turn right on NM-181 and cross under the I-25 overpass
      • Travel two and a half miles on NM-181, past the turnoff to the Municipal Airport
      • At the intersection of NM-52, turn left and travel away from the valley, toward the distant mountains – Cuchillo is six miles from the intersection and Winston is 28 miles
      • At the Winston Store, turn left on NM-52 and drive nine miles to the junction of NM-59, leading directly toward the mountains
      • Turn left on NM-59 and follow it for 31 miles to the Beaverhead Ranger Station, where there is a work station, rest area, and large parking lot
      • It takes about two and a half hours to drive from Truth or Consequences to Beaverhead, NM
    • The southern branch
      • Begin at the Geronimo Trail Interpretive Center and follow the main thoroughfare from the Interpretive Center through Truth or Consequences on Main Street and South Broadway to Williamsburg, approximately three miles
      • In Williamsburg, turn left onto NM-187 (the last intersection before entering the freeway)
      • Travel south on NM-187 for 14 miles, following the Rio Grande to the junction with NM-152
      • An RV park overlooking Caballo Lake is a the junction with NM-152 – turn right on NM-152 and continue to the towns of Hillsboro and Kinston
      • NM-152 beyond Kinston climbs up the eastern slope of the Black Range Mountains and tops out at Emory Pass
      • From Emory Pass, the road winds down to the small village of San Lorenzo – it is 53 miles from the turnoff near Caballo Lake to San Lorenzo
      • You may return across the Black Range to Truth or Consequences along the byway, or take a side trip on the Trail of the Mountain Spirits Scenic Byway

Other Information

  • Gas and food are available from Hillsboro to San Lorenzo across NM-152 – gas and food are not available north of Winston on NM-52 for eight miles, and on NM-59 to Beaverhead for 31 miles
  • San Lorenzo, NM is where the Geronimo Trail Scenic Byway meets the Trail of the Mountain Spirits Scenic Byway
  • There is lodging, shopping, restrooms, and phones along this byway
  • Camping is available along this byway:
    • Gila National Forest
    • Caballo Lake State Park
    • Elephant Butte Lake State Park
Historic Route 66 in New Mexico

Overview

Route 66 is our country’s “Mother Road,” complete with so much history from our nation’s past. The route stretches the entire width of New Mexico, passing through the center of the state in a east-west orientation. Along the route in New Mexico, discover ancient dwellings from ancestral Pueblo people, the remains of Spanish Colonial Mission homes, old West mining, homesteading, and ranching sites, early 1900s town and city destinations, and of course, the beautiful national parks, state parks, monuments, and historic sites, as well as spectacular scenery that dots the entire byway.

The Historic Route 66 remains, though segmented, in four U.S. states. The route is broken up, often paralleling other major roads, throughout Illinois, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Arizona. Clear route markers exist along most of the road. Below we have included directions and specifications for New Mexico and Arizona.

The New Mexico portion of Route 66 is a total of 604 miles / 972 km in length.

Key Attractions

  • Acoma Sky City, located off I-40 (take exit 96 east, or exit 108 west, and drive 15 miles) – Acoma Pueblo Village, located at the top of a 400 foot mesa, visitors can step back in time and visit the historic site to learn more about the ancient culture and see astounding scenery
  • Albuquerque and Santa Fe, NM – two of New Mexico’s largest and most famous towns, blending the old historic West with today’s modern culture – visit Albuquerque’s Biological Park, which includes an aquarium, a botanical garden, and a zoo
  • Bandelier National Monument, located off I-25 (take the St. Francis/84/285 exit for Santa Fe, then go straight through the city and follow the signs for Bandelier) – visitors can tour the ruins of ancient cliff dwellings from the 13th century ancestral Pueblo Indians
  • Blue Hole natural artesian springs, located off I-40 in Santa Rosa (drive 5 miles south toward the Municipal Airport) – natural springs that stay constantly at 61 degrees – part of the Carlsbad Cavern system
  • Bluewater Lake State Park, located 7 miles southwest of Prewitt and I-40 – visitors can enjoy the recreation that the large lake has to offer, particularly in summer months – in winter, ice fishing and skiing
  • Casamero Anasazi Ruins, located north of Prewitt, off of I-40 – view the ruins of the ancient, mysterious Anasazi people that lived in the area approximately 1000 to 1125 CE
  • Cibola National Forest – numerous recreational opportunities and magnificent wilderness area, visitors can view the majestic and varying landscape from their car or on foot
  • Conchas Lake State Park, located 34 miles north of Tacamcari, along Hwy 104 – this lake offers miles of shoreline and beaches, coves, canyons, and ample opportunity to discover something interesting, such as fossils from prehistoric sea creatures and unique rock formations
  • Fort Union, located in Watrous, NM – once the largest U.S. military base in the 19th Century southwest frontier, Fort Union offers a grand memorial to the men and women who helped win the West – visitors can tour the historic buildings and memorial
  • Pecos National Historic Park, located 25 miles southeast of Santa Fe off I-25 – this park houses over 10,000 years of history for the ancient pueblo of Pecos, two Spanish missions, the Santa Fe Trail destinations and the site of the Civil War Battle of Glorieta Pass
  • Isleta and Acoma Pueblo Missions, located in the Laguna Indian Reservation, east of NM-314 and west of the byway along NM-6 – ruins and remains of the oldest remaining mission homes and pueblos
  • Petroglyph National Monument, located west of Albuquerque – thousands of petroglyphs spanning 17 miles and over 12,000 years of human life

Location

For New Mexico:

Historic Route 66 in New Mexico begins at the NM/TX border. Get on Historic Route 66 and take it to Tucumcari, where you get back on I-40. In Montoya, get back on Route 66 and follow it past Newkirk, Cuervo, and Blue Hole. Once you reach Santa Rosa, you pick up on I-40 again. At the intersection of I-40 and State Route 84, take 84 (which is actually Route 66) northbound toward Las Vegas. When you come to Romeoville, stay on Route 66 as it curves back to the southwest and passes San Jose, Rowe, Pecos, and Glorieta, and then as it goes up to Santa Fe. Continue through Santa Fe down to Algodones, where Route 66 continues as NM 313 through Santa Ana Pueblo, Bernalillo, and Sandia Pueblo.

When you reach Albuquerque, there are four different ways you can choose:

  • You can head east and go past Nob Hill, Tijeras, Edgewood, and Moriarty to Longhorn, where the original Route 66 ends and you turn around and go back the way you came.
  • You can go west and meet up again with I-40 near Rio Puerco, where you continue on I-40 to where it meets up again with Route 66 at the Cibola County line.
  • You can continue straight ahead and stay on Route 66 as it goes south through Isleta Pueblo and back up to join post-1938* Route 66 near Correo.
  • You can continue on Route 66 past Mesita, Laguna Pueblo, Budville, Cubero, San Fidel, McCartys, Grants, Milan, Bluewater, Prewitt, Thoreau, Top O’ the World, Iyanbit, Ft. Wingate, and Gallup to the Arizona state line.

*Prior to 1938, Route 66 took the way up to Santa Fe and down to Albuquerque. After 1938, a more direct route was taken, and Route 36 cut directly from Albuquerque to Santa Rosa. Thus parts of Historic Route 66 are pre-1938 and some are post-1938.

For Arizona:

The Arizona segment of Historic Route 66 is a disjoint byway comprised of seven pieces. The first section follows I-40 through Holbrook, then a small section in Joseph City. The fourth section goes through Flagstaff. The fifth section goes through Williams. The sixth section is a little place in Ash Fork. Finally, there is a long section heading west on SR 65 from Seligman to Topock.

Specifically, the sections are:

  • Holbrook, mile marker 289-285
  • Joseph City, mile marker 277-274
  • Winslow, mile marker 257-252
  • Flagstaff, mile marker 211-191
  • Williams, mile marker 167-162
  • Ash Fork, mile marker 146-144
  • Topock, mile marker 167-0

More Information

  • Gas, food, lodging, phones, restrooms, and shopping are located all along this byway
  • Camping, bike trails, and other recreation are located nearby the byway – biking is not recommended for most of the byway because of its located along the interstate (I-40)
Jemez Mountain Trail Scenic Byway

Overview

The Jemez Mountain Trail Scenic byway allows visitors to explore life from several different time periods. The area has a rich history, with occupants spanning ancient ancestral Puebloan history, Spanish exploration, and more modern American ranching and logging history. Come explore the ancient pueblo and mission home – Jemez Pueblo – camp, hike, fish, bike, swim, horseback ride, or enjoy the natural hot springs in the Jemez Mountains.

163 miles / 262 km loop, Near Albuquerque

Key Attractions

Jemez Mountain Trail Map
  • Numerous Spanish and Indian ruins
  • Battleship Rock – a scenic cliff peak adorned with sharp and pointed rock spikes
  • Jemez River – beautiful river, fun for playing in, and offers several small falls, including the Falls Wayside destination off of the byway – framed by pine forests and rocky ledges
  • Santa Fe National Forest – about 65 miles of the byway are located in the national forest, and approximately 40 of those miles are part of the Jemez National Recreation Area – includes everything from fields of wildflowers to rugged peaks and raging rivers framed by the pine, spruce, and aspen forests
  • Jemez Pueblo and Jemez State Monument – located about 5 miles from San Ysidro – view the ancient Jemez ruins and the 17th-century Spanish mission home attached – 3,000 tribe members reside in the village of Walatowa, and visitors can enjoy traditional Jemez food, activities, and art, located at the Red Rocks area
  • Walatowa Visitor Center – gather information on the Jemez culture and history
  • San Ysidro – the small town located between NV-4 and US-550 – view the work of local artists and tour the restored Spanish era adobe church
  • Bandelier National Monument – 23,000 acres of protected, designated wilderness, large cliffs and deep canyons, and ancient ancestral Pueblo dwellings can found within the area

Location

  • 1 mile away from Los Alamos, New Mexico; 18 miles from Española, New Mexico; 32 miles from Santa Fe, New Mexico
  • Located in north-central New Mexico
  • Driving the byway:
    • Start at Los Alamos, NM and drive west on NM-4 to La Cueva, NM
    • The byway branches north and south here, and drivers can complete the byway two different ways:
      • North branch:
        • Drive north on NM-126 to the end of that arm of the byway (where the pavement ends)
        • Continue on NM-126 (unpaved & accessible if weather permits) for about 10 miles, where the byway and pavement begins again
        • Continue traveling on Nm-126 to Cuba, NM
        • Take US-550 south in Cuba, NM towards San Ysidro, NM
        • Take NM-4 north in San Ysidro, NM towards La Cueva, where drivers will complete the loop
      • South branch:
        • Drive south on NM-4 towards San Ysidro, NM
        • In San Ysidro, NM take US-550 west and then north towards Cuba, NM
        • In Cuba, NM, take NM-126 southeast until the byway ends (where the pavement stops)
        • Drivers have the option of looping back the way they came by continuing southeast on NM-126 on the unpaved part of the road for about 10 miles, until the byway starts up again just north of La Cueva, NM – where they drove the byway before

Other Information

  • Gas, lodging, food, and shopping are located along this byway
  • There are several campsites located along this byway, including:
    • Paliza Campground – Located four miles north of Ponderosa on SR 290
    • Vista Linda Campground – Located approximately five miles south of Jemez Springs on SR 4
    • Redondo Campground – Found 11 miles north of Jemez Springs on SR 4
    • San Antonio Campgrounds – Located two miles northwest of SR 4, just off SR 126
    • Horseshoe Springs Campgrounds – Found one mile northwest of SR 4, just off SR 126
    • Seven Springs Campground – Go eight miles northwest of La Cueva on SR 126, then take Forest Road 314 for one mile.
    • Rio Las Vacas Campground – Found 13 miles east of Cuba on SR 126
    • Clear Creek Campground – Located 12 miles east of Cuba on SR 126
    • Jemez Falls Campground – Situated 15 miles northeast of Jemez Springs, just off SR 4
    • Las Conchas Campground – Located 25 miles northeast of Jemez Springs on SR 4
Santa Fe Trail Scenic Byway

Overview

 The Santa Fe Trail was one of the nation’s first and most important trade routes – connecting Missouri and the rest of the inhabited country to the Mexican Frontier. The Colorado section of this scenic byway follows plains and rolling hills, to high mountain peaks and river valleys. Enjoy an assortment of activities to do, from numerous historic sites and museums to biking and camping along the byway.

 180 miles / 289 km (approximately) in the Colorado section; 480 miles / 772.5 km total in Colorado and New Mexico.

 Key Attractions

  • Historic trading posts like Bent’s Old Fort and Boggsville, the last home of Kit Carson
  • Visit historic stagecoach stops, with beautiful views and images into the history of the Santa Fe Trail
  • Explore the many welcome centers and museums that this byway has to offer, including: the Colorado Byway Visitors Center and the Santa Fe Trail Museum in the Trinidad History Museum
  • Look for famous Wild West charm, rural, picturesque ranches and farms, and historic sites of Kit Carson, Billy the Kid, the Bent Brothers, and Bat Masterson
  • Comanche National Grassland – home to North America’s largest dinosaur track site – with guided tours and a history that covers the Native Americans that lived there, Spanish explorers, pioneer traders, miners, and merchants
  • Scenic hiking, camping, fishing, hunting, and biking – biking is very popular from Trinidad to the CO/KA border (rolling hills and moderate terrain – bicyclists are allowed to travel on I-25)

 Location

  • 174 miles from Denver, CO; 60 miles from Albuquerque, NM; located from Santa Fe, NM/ the northeastern section of NM to the southeastern section of CO.
  • Driving directions:
    • The Colorado section
      • The Colorado section of the Santa Fe Trail starts at the state line of Colorado and Kansas on US-50
      • Drive west on US-50 to Goff Ave in Granada, CO
      • Continue west on Goff Ave to Main St in Lamar, CO, then continue north to US-50
      • Continue west on US-50 to Bent Ave
      • Drive south to Ambassador Thompson Blvd, then head west to E 1st Dr
      • Make your way west to Barnes Ave, then south to W 5th St.
      • Continue west to Potter Dr. and then southwest to John F. Kennedy Memorial Hwy
      • Drive south on John F. Kennedy Memorial Hwy to the state line of Colorado and New Mexico, where the Colorado section ends

Other Information

  • There is gas, lodging, shopping, restrooms, and camping along this route
Tracks Across Borders Scenic Byway

Tracks Across Borders Byway runs along the Colorado/New Mexico border between Durango, Colorado and Chama, New Mexicotqc. It provides access to Native American cultures, breathtaking scenery, vital communities, and ancient sites.

Total length: 125 miles
Total driving time: 4.5 hours

Portions of the byway are unpaved gravel but suitable for travel in a family car.

The byway roughly follows the tracks of the nation’s largest narrow gauge railroad
system – the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad (D&RG). It links the D&RG with the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic RR. Both are remaining parts of the San Juan Extension, built in the early 1880’s.

The byway skirts Chaco ruins, Chimney Rock National Monument and Navajo Lake, which is a major recreation area. It provides access to early logging, ranching and farming areas.

The byway is a gem well worth driving.

www.tracksacrossborders.com

www.codot.gov/travel/scenic-byways

Trail of the Mountain Spirits Scenic Byway

Overview

This byway has a number of recreational activities along the way, including canoeing, tubing, biking, horseback riding, hiking, exploring, camping, and fishing. Visitors can walk along and cross the continental divide, explore the old mining and homestead sites, and visit the ruins of ancient cliff-dwellers to gather a sense of what it might have been like to live in their era.

110 miles / 177 km loop, Silver City to Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument to San Lorenzo

Key Attractions

  • Camping, hiking, and backpacking – there are many trails and campsites along the byway, including campsites with hookups available for RVs – some popular areas include the Gila National Forest, the Gila Wilderness Area, and the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument
  • Horseback riding and mountain biking – permitted both on and off the numerous trails in Gila National Forest – excellent riding area with beautiful scenery and a cooler mountain climate
  • Canoeing – available and accessible in several places along the Gila River
  • Bayard, NM – visit the old historic mining district, Santa Rita Mine, historical reenactments, old western scenes (like horse-drawn carriages and wagons in the streets), and historic Fort Bayard, the U.S. Army fort
  • Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument – view the prehistoric cliff homes of the Mogollon people that lived in the area from about the 1280s to early 1300s
  • Gila Wilderness – come view the extensive wilderness area, home to panoramic views and ancient volcanic history – the evidence of basalt boulders and towers remains here today
  • Continental Divide – the byway crosses the divide several times and crosses paths with the Continental Divide Trail – an important and popular hiking destination
  • Varying, beautiful scenery – from the denser forests of pines and aspens along the mountainous Continental Divide to the jagged, brown cliffs along the Gila River, to the drier, grassy hills with juniper trees
  • Bird-watching – Lake Roberts and the Cameron Creek birding areas – popular spots for birding – enjoy hundreds of species of birds, including about ten species of hummingbird in this area
  • City of Rocks State Park, located south of the byway, west of NM-61 – visitors can see the unique rock formations, great for exploring, camping, and hiking, formed by ancient volcanic eruptions

Location

  • Located in the center of the southwest quadrant of the state of New Mexico
  • 210 miles southwest of Albuquerque, NM; 109 miles northwest of Las Cruces, NM; 201 miles northeast of Tucson, AZ
  • Driving the byway:
    • The byway is basically the shape of a triangle, with an arm extending from the northern point of the triangle
    • Starting in Silver Springs, NM (the southwestern point of the triangle), at the junction of E. Broadway Street and NM-90, travel north on NM-90 to Hwy 180
    • Drive Hwy 180 a short distance to the junction with NM-15
    • Here the byway splits into two sections (two arms of the triangle), the northern section and the eastern section
    • Northern Section:
      • Take NM-15 north through Pinos Altos
      • Continue north on NM-15 until the byway meets up with the eastern section at NM-15 and NM-35
    • Eastern Section:
      • Take Hwy 180 east and exit onto NM-152, east of Santa Clara
      • Continue on NM-152 until the junction with NM-35
      • Drive NM-35 northwest through Mimbres and continue until the byway meets up with the northern section at the junction of NM-15 and NM-35
      • From the junction of NM-15 and NM-35, drive NM-15 north to the byway’s end, near the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument

Other Information

  • Gas, lodging, food, restrooms, and shopping are located along the byway, mainly in Silver City, NM
  • The portion of the byway located from NM-15 to NM-35 is not recommended for RVs and trailers
Turquoise Trail Scenic Byway

Overview

The Turquoise Trail is believed to be an ancient path, traveled by ancestral Puebloan people. The Byway is located between Albuquerque and Santa Fe, New Mexico. Along the byway, visitors will find unique geologic formations and scenery, like no other place on earth, beautiful desert and mountain landscapes, recreational opportunities, and historic sites and museums.

62 miles / 99.8 km, Tijeras near Albuquerque to I-25 near Santa Fe

Key Attractions

Turquoise Trail Map
  • Sandia Mountains – view beautiful crest of the mountains, especially beautiful in springtime, covered in dense, green foliage with rugged rock outcroppings
  • Sandia Peak Ski Area – great winter and summer activities, with chair-rides in the warm months, and tram rides year-round
  • Cibola National Forest – beautiful scenery and endless opportunities for recreation
  • Garden of the Gods Rock Formation – visitors can view the amazing rock formations from the road or stop and explore the area – beautiful and interesting deposits of sandstone and mudstone, visible in horizontal, tilted layers due to geologic activity beneath the earth’s surface
  • Museum of Archaeology & Material Culture – 22 Calvary Rd. in Cedar Creek, NM – exhibits on the 12,000 year history of the area
  • Mining and railway museums – located along the byway

 Location

  • Central-northern New Mexico
  • 14 miles from Albuquerque, NM; Santa Fe located on byway
  • Driving the byway:
    • At the junction of NM-337 and Forest Rd 423 near Tijeras, NM, take NM-337 north to NM-333.
    • Travel northeast on NM-333 to NM-14
    • Take NM-14 north until junction with NM-306/NM-536
    • The road branches here, and travelers can take the Sandia Crest spur:
      • Turn left onto NM-536 heading west
      • Continue on NM-536 and follow it past the junction with NM-165 until you reach Sandia Crest, where the road ends
      • Return to the junction with NM-536 and NM-14
    • Travel north on NM-14 through Madrid
    • Byway ends at junction of NM-14 and I-25 southwest of Santa Fe

Other Information

  • There is shopping, gas, food, and lodging along this byway
  • Camping is available along the byway at Turquoise Trail Campground and at some nearby locations within the National Park

Top


Utah

https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/byways/states/UT

Dinosaur Diamond Prehistoric Highway

Overview

Dinosaur Diamond Prehistoric Highway is a multi-state byway that is accessible from various points in both Colorado and Utah. This ancient dinosaur mega-highway offers some of the best museums, collections of fossils and bones, learning and activity centers, and open, active excavations that are still making new discoveries today. Various sites display tracks and bones still unearthed in the ground. Some of the largest, most perplexing creatures have been discovered along this byway, and it is certainly a place for all ages to learn, play, and fulfill a childhood dream of exploring dinosaur country. Come visit and enjoy some of the all-time best dinosaur excavation sites in the world!

480 miles / 772.5 km

Key Attractions

  • A substantial group of dinosaur museums, containing some of the best collections of dinosaur remnants, as well as replicas, recreations, and monuments in the world
    • Dinosaur National Monument, located in eastern Utah and western Colorado.
    • Riggs Hill, near Grand Junction, CO – displays part of a buried dinosaur skeleton for visitors to see
    • Museum of Western Colorado, in Grand Junction, CO – with three active paleontology sites.
    • Dinosaur Journey Museum, in Fruita, CO – excellent for all ages, children can be hands on in their discovery and learning with wonderful displays, full-scale recreations, and robotic simulations
    • Dinosaur Hill, just south of Fruita, CO – a one-mile trip around the excavation areas where some of the largest dinosaurs to ever be discovered were found – the Apatosaurus (Brontosaurus) excelusandBrachiosaurus altithorax
    • The Utah Filed House Natural History Museum in Vernal.
  • Proximity to National Parks (Arches National Park, Zion National Park, Canyonlands National Park, etc.), National Monuments (such as Independence Rock in Colorado National Monument), and ancient Indian rock art (including the famous petroglyphs in 9-mile Canyon)
  • Access to wonderful hiking, camping, biking trails, river rafting (along the Green and the Colorado), and skiing (away from the ski-resorts)

Location

  • 111 miles from Salt Lake City, UT; 250 miles from Denver, CO
  • Driving the byway (Colorado section)
    • Start at the Utah-Colorado border on US-40
    • Turn south onto CO-64 at Dinosaur and continue onto Rangley
    • From Rangley, drive south on SR 139 to Loma
    • From Loma, drive east to Fruita on US-6 and Grand Junction
    • To loop back to the UT section, drive west on I-70 to the UT/CO border, where the Colorado section of the byway ends
  • Driving the byway (Utah section)
    • UT/CO border via I-70
      • The Utah section starts at the UT/CO border on I-70; head west
      • Take exit 212, the eastern Cisco exit, turn left over the Interstate
      • 1 ½ miles west of Cisco, turn left at a three-way junction with UT-128 and head south toward the Colorado River, Castle Valley, and Moab
      • At the intersection with US-191, turn left (south) to reach Moab, UT
    • Moab, UT to Green River, UT
      • Turn right (north) onto US-191 and cross the Colorado River
      • Continue north to Crescent Junction and I-70
      • Take I-70 west past Green River, UT
    • Green River, UT to Price, UT
      • Two miles west of Green River, UT turn north at exit 156 onto US-6/191
      • Drive north towards Price, UT, approximately 60 miles northwest
    • Price, UT to Duchesne, UT
      • From Price, continue north and west on US-6/191 through the town of Helper
      • Four miles north of Helper is where US-6/191 splits; take the right hand turn onto US-191 that runs down over the Price River, the railroad tracks, and around the coal-fired power plant you can see
      • Continue on US-191 for 44 miles up Willow Creek Canyon, up and over Reservation Ridge with a pass at just over 9,000 feet above sea level, and down through Indian Canyon to the town of Duchesne, UT in the Uintah Basin
    • Duchesne, UT to Vernal, UT
      • A few blocks after crossing the Strawberry River, there is a stop sign dividing US-191 from US-40
      • Turn right and drive east on US-40 through Myton at the Duchesne River bridge and then through Roosevelt
      • US-40 continues on into Vernal ending on Main Street
    • Vernal, UT to UT/CO border
      • Take US-40 east for 12 miles to reach Jensen, UT
      • Continue east across the bridge over the Green River
      • Travel 18 miles to UT/CO border where the Utah section of the byway ends

Other Information

  •  Plenty of lodging, food, gas, and camping in various cities
Flaming Gorge – Uintas Scenic Byway

Overview

This byway offers visitors a variety of perspectives as they travel through the eastern section of the Uinta Mountain Range, Ashley National Forest, Flaming Gorge Recreation Area, and Vernal’s dinosaur destinations. Here visitors can experience one of the most scenic drives in the country – named “Flaming Gorge” for the landscape that it accurately depicts, enjoy the prime recreational opportunities that this area has to offer, see native wildlife in their natural habitats, and even gaze out over prehistoric, real dinosaur fossils – still entrenched in the ground as they were found.

82 miles / 132 km, Vernal to Wyoming border

Key Attractions

Flaming Gorge/Uintas Scenic Byway
  • Flaming Gorge Reservoir – beautiful reservoir with towering cliffs, canyons, beaches – excellent fishing, boating, water sports, swimming, scuba diving, canoeing, etc. – the Flaming Gorge Recreation Area is a prime spot for camping, hiking, biking, river rafting, swimming, and more
  • Red Canyon Visitor Center & Nature Trail – information about the reservoir and area – trail leads to an overlook over Flaming Gorge’s scenic Red Canyon
  • Flaming Gorge Dam and Visitor Center – guided tours offered in the dam
  • Dinosaur National Monument & Quarry, Vernal, UT – one of the largest dinosaur quarries and collection of dinosaur fossils in the world, over 2,000 fossil bones are exposed in the ground, like they were found
  • Utah Field House of Natural History, Vernal UT – exhibits on the area’s animals, geology, paleontology, prehistory, and history – see an interactive garden area with 18 life-size replicas of prehistoric creatures
  • Several other water recreation areas – Steinaker State Park, Red Fleet State Park, and several smaller lakes and streams within Ashley National Forest

Location

  • 52 miles south of Rock Springs, WY; 168 miles east of Salt Lake City, UT; 330 miles west of Denver, CO
  • Located in the northeast corner of the state of Utah
  • Driving the byway:
    • Starting in Vernal, UT, drive north on US-191
    • At the junction of US-191 and SR-44/ Greendale Junction, the byway forks east and west
    • The east fork (right turn), will allow you to continue on US-191 until you reach the Utah-Wyoming border, where that arm of the byway ends
    • The west fork (left turn), will take you west and then north along SR-44 until you reach Manila, UT, where that arm of the byway ends

Other Information

  • Gas, lodging, food, shopping, phones, and restrooms are located along the byway
  • Camping is available in several locations throughout Ashley National Forest – reservations can be made at recreation.gov
  • Biking the byway is possible, however alternate nearby trails and paths are recommended over the actual byway – always use caution when biking or walking along a busy or narrow highway
Logan Canyon Scenic Byway

Overview

 Logan Canyon Scenic Byway takes travelers from Logan, UT to Garden City, UT, passing through Logan Canyon and paralleling the Logan River. Visitors enjoy mile-high, jagged limestone outcroppings, thick, green forests, grassy meadows, rivers, lakes, and beautiful colors – particularly in the spring and fall. This byway is an ideal destination for hikers, campers, bikers, golfers, and fishermen (including fly fishermen).

 41 miles / 66 km, Logan to Garden City

 Key Attractions

Logan Canyon Byway Map

 Absolutely stunning canyon with a range of spectacular scenery – tall, limestone outcroppings, pine and aspen forests, grassy meadows and wildflowers, brilliant fall and pretty spring colors, tranquil river, etc.

  • Blind Hollow Trail – set amid Wasatch-Cache National Forest in a beautiful forest of aspen trees and green vegetation
  • Tony Grove Lake, located on Tony Grove Rd off Hwy 89 – leads up to a high elevation, glacial lake often called the “crown jewel” of the Bear River Range
  • Mt. Magog – picturesque and iconic views of the tall jagged peaks, covered by green forests over White Pine Lake
  • Bear Lake Overlook – spectacular overlook over the lake and Garden City area
  • Second Dam, Logan Canyon – boardwalk, trail, and picnic area
  • Third Dam/ Spring Hollow, Logan Canyon – extremely popular fly fishing location, hiking trails, rest stop – trail leads to natural springs and to the Crimson Trail
  • Logan Golf & Country Club – a fun resort located in Logan Canyon

 Location

  • 51 miles from Ogden, UT; 84 miles from Salt Lake City, UT
  • Located in the northeastern top of Utah
  • Driving the byway:
    • Start from the intersection of Main Street and 400 North in Logan, UT
    • Drive east on 400 north to Milepost 374.2 at Lady Bird Park Overlook (Logan Ranger District Visitor Center is located here)
    • Continue on this route, Hwy 89, up the canyon (the Logan River runs parallel to the highway most of the way)
    • After driving approximately 45 minutes up the canyon, you will reach the Summit over Bear Lake and a visitor center that has information on both the byway and the area
    • The Byway ends in Garden City, UT on the shores of Bear Lake

 Other Information

  • Campgrounds and destinations next to the byway may charge fees
  • Gas, lodging, shopping, food, restrooms, and phones are located at each end of the byway, Logan and Garden City
  • This byway is bicycle-friendly – Hwy 89 has shoulders that can support bicyclists and nearby trails are great for biking and hiking
  • Camping is available in several locations
    • Free primitive camping located throughout the Wasatch-Cache National Forest, and reservation camping is located specifically at Spring Hollow Campground, Guinavah Campground, Tony Grove Campground, and Sunrise Campground
National Scenic Byway Highway SR-143

Byway description: From Parowan, the highway climbs past the colorful Vermillion Cliffs through a maple and scrub oak forest. The road twists through cone-shaped white cliffs then makes a major ascent to the forested heights of Brian Head ski town. Past Brian Head, the road climbs again to summit at 10,400 feet and continues south past the North View of Cedar Breaks National Monument, where it junctions with Hwy SR-148.

Heading east, the road descends through a thick aspen forest which is brilliant in the late September with golden and red aspens. You’ll see distant views into the pink cliffs of the Paunsagunt Plateau. Ancient lava fields pop up through the aspen trees that line the highway. The road meets up with Panguitch Lake which is popular for fishing and boating. SR 143 continues east, following lush pastures and the banks of the Panguitch Lake Creek into historic Panguitch.

How do I get there? From Parowan I- 15 exit #78, go south on Parowan’s Main Street, turn left at Center St/SR-143and head east.

Is road open in the winter? Yes, but check road conditions in the winter.

Side Trips & Viewpoints:

  • Parowan Cemetery
  • Vermillion Cliffs Picnic Area
  • Yankee Meadow
  • Hidden Haven Waterfall
  • Dry Lakes Scenic Backway
  • Brian Head Resort
  • Brian Head Peak Road
  • Cedar Breaks
  • Panguitch Lake
  • Historic Panguitch

What is the one way, no stops drive time? The drive is 55 miles and takes about 90 minutes to travel.

Grade & Elevation: 13% Grade. Elevation is from 5,600 feet to 10,400 feet. The portion between Parowan and Brian Head is steep and not recommended for RV’s or semi trucks.

Services: Lodging, gas, food, campgrounds, visitor centers in Parowan, Brian Head and Panguitch.

Nebo Loop Scenic Byway

Overview

This byway has a little bit of almost everything Utah has to offer – experience scenic views of Mt. Nebo and the Wasatch Mountain Range, aspen and conifer forests, meadows, high-mountain lakes and streams, towering cliffs, salt flats, and even some red rock formations that are more usual to southern Utah. Whether simply driving the byway or getting out and enjoying some recreation, travelers are guaranteed to experience breathtaking views of nature. Popular recreation includes hiking, fishing, biking, camping, horseback riding, canoeing, rock climbing, swimming, etc.

37 miles / 59.5 km, Payson to Junction, Highway 132 near Nephi

Key Attractions

Nebo Loop Map
  • Peteetneet Museum and Cultural Arts Center, Payson, UT – restored historic building, used now for arts classes and performances
  • Many small lakes and rivers – including Payson Lakes, Big East Lake, McClellan Lake, Thistle Creek, Salt Creek, etc. – surrounded by beautiful aspen forests and mountain views
  • Uinta National Forest and Manti-La Sal National Forests
  • Scenic autumn drive – this byway is popular for viewing the beautiful and contrasting fall colors in the foliage and sky
  • Petticoat Cliffs – huge, towering gray cliffs that are shaped like giant pinnacles
  • Many trails and paths – including the popular:
    • Monument Trail – beautiful year-round, but particularly scenic in the autumn, hikers enjoy views overlooking the valleys below them, snow-capped peaks in the distance, and the lush trees and foliage around them
    • Devil’s Kitchen – enjoy and explore the red rock spires and unique rock formations that look more like they belong farther south in Utah, yet they are surrounded by green forests and mountain peaks – short (1/2 mile), easy hike
    • Mt. Nebo – the highest peak in the large Wasatch Mountain Range and a challenging hike – 11,928 feet

Location

  • 59 miles south of Salt Lake City, UT; 224 miles north of St. George, UT
  • Located in central Utah
  • Driving the byway:
    • Start in Payson, UT
    • Drive east on 7th South (Payson Canyon Road) to the beginning of the byway (CR-015) in Payson Canyon
    • Continue along this road until the end of the byway – the junction with UT-132, just east of Nephi, UT
  • khawk Campground, Tinney Flat Campground, Bear Canyon Campground, and Ponderosa Uinta Campground
  • Bicycling is a popular activity along this byway, however cyclists should use caution on the narrow sections of the road
  • This byway features several locations that are fully accessible for the disabled, including accessible campgrounds and overlooks, horse transfer station for the disabled at Blackhawk Campground, accessible lakeside nature trail, fishing pier, beach area, and annual fishing derby for children with disabilities at Payson Lakes Campground
  • The byway isn’t plowed and maintained for passenger vehicles – the best time to drive the byway is spring through autumn

Other Information

Scenic Byway 12

Overview

This byway provides an outstanding range of the recreation, scenery, and geological formations that Utah has to offer. The byway takes you through national and state parks and monuments – offering incredible red rock scenery, deep slot canyons, waterfalls, beautiful canyons, high mountains, juniper forests, and intense varieties of colors, no matter what season you visit in. Enjoy local archaeological, historical, and paleontological sites, as well as the exciting recreation – including hiking, camping, fishing, rock climbing, canyoneering, swimming, and horseback riding.

124 miles / 199.6 km, Panguitch to Torrey

Key Attractions

Scenic Byway 12
  • Boulder Mountain – great opportunities for fishing, camping, and hiking – breathtaking views and refreshing scenery – located on the Aquarius Plateau, the highest timbered plateau in North America
  • Powell Point – just north and in between Tropic and Henrieville – towering red rock mountain that stands out above the trees
  • Head of the Rocks Overlook – north of Escalante and south of Boulder – expansive and panoramic views of the countryside, stretching hundreds of miles with no obstacles in the path, only canyons and valleys below
  • Mossy Cave Trail and the Tropic Creek Waterfall – northwest of Tropic, UT – a scenic place to cool off, fun family activity area
  • Losee Canyon and the Arches Trail – hiking path where visitors can enjoy natural sandstone arches and other unique rock formations and landscapes
  • Sunrise Point – viewpoint overlooking Bryce Canyon National Park
  • Bryce Canyon National Park – the canyon contains some of the most stunning and absolutely unique rock formations, called hoodoos, in the entire world – made of colorful reds and oranges, surrounded by greenery and blue skies
  • Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument – large area that holds some of the most difficult terrain known to mankind – filled with different geologic formations, including arches, bridges, slot canyons, ridges, plateaus, mesas, buttes, and pinnacles – holds excellent examples of ancient rock art and paleontological sites
  • Capitol Reef National Park – park filled with great hikes, canyons, bridges, arches, creeks, and the Waterpocket Fold – the interesting geologic shape, a wrinkle in the earth, that extends for about 100 miles
  • Calf Creek Falls, Escalante Canyons – very popular and iconic hike to upper and lower falls – great for cooling off – fun for family
  • Reconstructed Anasazi House – Anasazi Village State Park, Boulder, UT – interactive tours and information of the building styles and history of the ancient Anasazi people
  • Boulder, UT – western-style, pastoral, and historic scenery – ranches, farms, barns, museums, and more

Location

  • 470 miles southeast from Denver, CO; 251 miles south of Salt Lake City, UT; 126 miles northeast of St. George, UT
  • Located in south-central Utah
  • Driving the byway:
    • Begin the byway at the junction of Hwy 89 and SR-12, seven miles south of Panguitch, UT and eight miles north of Hatch, UT
    • Drive east on SR-12 toward Tropic and Escalante – the road runs generally southeast until Escalante, where it runs primarily north
    • Continue on SR-12 until the end of the byway – the junction of SR-12 and Hwy 24, just east of Torrey, UT

Other Information

  • Gas, food, lodging, shopping, restrooms, and phones are located along this byway – most located in the towns at the ends of the byway, Panguitch, and Torrey
  • Campsites are available in several locations – within Dixie National Forest, Bryce Canyon National Park, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, and in various state parks and other recreation areas – primitive camping is available in several locations
  • Biking is a popular activity along this byway – bike paths are available through the Red Canyon area, near Panguitch – biking is not encouraged near The Hogsback area farther north, near Torrey, because of the narrow width of the road and varying weather

The Energy Loop: Huntington/Eccles Canyon Scenic Byway

Overview

This byway provides ample opportunities for travelers to enjoy the both rich history and the rich recreation that the area has to offer. The area still maintains many of its industrial productions, such as Skyline Mine, and is situated near many historic sites from its earlier industry days – mines, railways, mining towns, coal-fired plants, and museums and ranger-stations. The byway itself winds through the Manti-La Sal National Forest, rising to about 10,000 feet. Recreation is abundant, and byway travelers also have great opportunities for camping, hiking, fishing, fly fishing, canoeing, boating, biking, horseback riding, and more. The area is breathtaking, with deep, clear blues from the pristine waters, and lush greens from the mountain-sides and forests.

86 miles / 138.3 km, Colton to Huntington

Key Attractions

Huntington/Eccles Canyons Energy Loop
  • Fairview Museum of History and Art, Fairview, UT –
  • Historic mining towns – Scofield,
  • Historic and current-day mining and energy sites – such as Skyline Mine on State Hwy 264
  • Fairview Canyon – scenic canyon, beautiful spring and fall colors, access to trails and spectacular, panoramic views that can stretch 100 miles on a clear day – runs parallel to the beautiful Huntington Creek that provides many recreational opportunities
  • Scofield Reservoir, Huntington Lake, Electric Lake, Fairview Lakes, and Joes Valley Reservoir – excellent fishing, boating (small boats), swimming, picnicking, and exploring areas – beautiful blue waters that are less frequently visited by other travelers
  • Located near the cities of Helper, Price, Wellington, and Cleveland, UT – providing opportunities to view historic mines and railroads, the College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum (Price), and the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry National Natural Landmark (Cleveland)

Location

  • 93 miles south of Salt Lake City, UT
  • Located in central Utah
  • Driving the byway:
    • In Fairview, UT, take State Hwy 31 east to the junction at the top of Fairview Canyon with State Hwy 264
    • Here the byway splits to the north and to the south
      • North Fork:
        • Take State Hwy 264 east to Scofield, UT
        • Here travelers can take a small spur of the byway down to Clear Creek, or continue driving north on State Hwy 96, which ends at Hwy 6 in Colton, UT – the end of the byway
      • South Fork:
        • At the junction of State Hwy 31 and State Hwy 264, stay on State Hwy 31 – which leads mostly south
        • Continue on State Hwy 31 until the end of the byway, in Huntington, UT – about 40 miles away

Other Information

  • Gas, lodging, food, shopping, restrooms, and phones are available along this byway
  • There are several established campgrounds within the Manti-La Sal National Forest, reservations can be made at recreation.gov
Trail of the Ancients Scenic Byway

Overview

The Utah portion of the Trail of the Ancients Scenic Byway leads you through some of the most iconic of all American landscapes, like Monument Valley, as well as some of the most diverse and beautiful. Visitors of this byway can enjoy world-class ancient Native American cliff dwellings, petroglyphs, art, and artifacts, as well as modern Native American communities, markets, and fairs. Travelers can enjoy both the wonderful drive along the byway, witnessing some of the most interesting landscapes on earth, and the many stops that include opportunities for hiking, camping, and exploring.

480 miles / 772 km total for Utah and Colorado

Key Attractions

Trail of the Ancients
  • Butler Wash Indian Ruins – large concave niche protects a community of ancient cliff dwellings
  • Utah Navajo Fair – held each year in Bluff, UT
  • Local Navajo market and trading post in Monument Valley, UT
  • Incredible desert scenery, expansive views, and ancient Indian remains at several locations, including Natural Bridges National Monument, Hovenweep National Monument, and Edge of the Cedars State Park
  • Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park – famous sandstone buttes towering over desert valleys, visitors center, and Navajo community and market
  • Four Corners – the only point in the United States where four boundaries meet
  • Historic pioneer and prairie settlements and buildings – particularly in Bluff, UT
  • Iconic scenery of golden sand, sandstone buttes, cedar forests, desert wildlife, and sprawling mountains, cliffs, and canyons
  • Camping, biking, and hiking are the main recreational activities along this byway

Location

  • Located in the Four Corners region of southwest Colorado and southeast Utah
  • 287 miles southeast of Salt Lake City, UT; 384 miles southwest of Colorado Spring, CO; 251 miles northwest of Albuquerque, NM
  • Driving the Utah section of the byway:
    • Byway starts at the Utah-Colorado state line on US-491
    • Drive west on US-491 to Monticello, UT
    • In Monticello, UT, turn south or left onto US-191 and drive 20.3 miles past Blanding, UT
    • Continue on US-191 south for 5.7 miles to the junction with U-95
    • Turn west or right onto U-95
    • Continue on U-95 to Bridge View Dr. to the Natural Bridges National Monument
    • Return to the junction of U-95 and U-261
    • Drive southwest on U-261 to US 163
    • Continue south on US 163 to the state line of Utah and Arizona
    • Return to the junction of US 163 and U-261
    • Drive northeast on US 163 to US 191/U-162
    • Continue on US 191/U-162 past Bluff, UT to U-262 just east of Montezuma Creek
    • Continue on US-162 to the Utah-Colorado state line
    • Return to the junction of US 191 and U-162
    • Drive north on US 191 to junction with U-262
    • Turn right and follow U-262/Hovenweep Rd, which will turn into Reservation Road
    • Turn north onto CR 413 and drive to the Utah-Colorado state line.
    • Return to junction of US 191 and U-262
    • Continue north on US 191 through White Mesa joining with rest of byway at junction of US 191 and U-95

Other Information

  • In Utah, visitors centers, gas, lodging, and food are located in Monticello, Blanding, Bluff, Mexican Hat, and Monument Valley
  • Camping and restroom locations are located along this byway
  • Fees may exist for entrance to parks

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