ARIZONA ~ COLORADO ~ NEVADA ~ NEW MEXICO ~ UTAH


Arizona

Canyon de Chelly National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

For nearly 5,000 years, people have lived in these canyons – longer than anyone has lived uninterrupted anywhere on the Colorado Plateau. In the place called Tsegi, their homes and images tell us their stories. Today, Navajo families make their homes, raise livestock, and farm the lands in the canyons.

Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Take a lonely and rocky two-track road in a 4×4 to the edge of the Grand Wash Cliffs. Find a stunning solitary vista deep into the Grand Canyon. Relax in the shade of ponderosas at Mt. Trumbull. Touch ancient waters at Pakoon Springs in one of the driest places in the world.

Navajo National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Navajo National Monument Arizona The Hopi, San Juan Southern Paiute, Zuni, and Navajo are tribes that have inhabited the canyons for centuries. Springs fed into farming land on the canyon floor and homes were built in the natural sandstone alcoves.

Petroglyph National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Petroglyph National Monument protects one of the largest petroglyph sites in North America, featuring designs and symbols carved onto volcanic rocks by Native Americans and Spanish settlers 400 to 700 years ago. These images are a valuable record of cultural expression and hold profound spiritual significance for contemporary Native Americans and for the descendants of the early Spanish settlers.

Pipe Spring National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Beneath vermilion cliffs, American Indians, Mormon ranchers, plants, animals, and many others have depended on the life-giving water found at the desert oasis at Pipe Spring. Learn about settler and Kaibab Paiute life by exploring the museum, historic fort and cabins, garden, and Ridge Trail.

Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

The cinder cone volcano’s rim is the dusky red of sunset, but the crater is only part of the story. Around 1085 the ground began to shake, and lava spewed high into the air. When the eruption finished, it had changed both the landscape and the people who lived here.

Walnut Canyon National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Come gaze across curved canyon walls. Among the remarkable geological formations of the canyon itself, the former homes of ancient inhabitants are easily evident. Along the trails you can imagine life within Walnut Canyon, while visiting actual pueblos and walking in the steps of those who came before.

Wupatki National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Nestled between the Painted Desert and ponderosa highlands of northern Arizona, Wupatki is a landscape of legacies. Ancient pueblos dot red-rock outcroppings across miles of prairie. Where food and water seem impossible to find, people built pueblos, raised families, farmed, traded, and thrived.

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Colorado

Programs: National Conservation Lands: Colorado: Canyons of the Ancients | Bureau of Land Management

Virtual Visitor Center Following guidance from the CDC and recommendations from state and local public health authorities, the Tres Rios Field Office is temporarily restricting in-person access to Canyons of the Ancients Visitor Center and Museum. Please call the office for customer services that may be available by phone, email or in-person at 970-882-5600.

Chimney Rock National Monument – Home

NEWS ALERT For information about the upcoming Virtual Lecture Series with Erica Ellingson click HERE. What is Chimney Rock? This undiscovered gem is an intimate, off-the-beaten-path archaeological site located at the southern edge of the San Juan Mountains in Southwestern Colorado. You’ll walk in the footsteps

Colorado National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Colorado National Monument preserves one of the grand landscapes of the American West. But this treasure is much more than a monument. Towering monoliths exist within a vast plateau and canyon panorama. You can experience sheer-walled, red rock canyons along the twists and turns of Rim Rock Drive, where you may spy bighorn sheep and soaring eagles.

Hovenweep National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Once home to over 2,500 people, Hovenweep includes six prehistoric villages built between A.D. 1200 and 1300. Explore a variety of structures, including multistory towers perched on canyon rims and balanced on boulders. The construction and attention to detail will leave you marveling at the skill and motivation of the builders.

Yucca House National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Through a continuing tradition of public and private cooperation, Yucca House National Monument preserves one of the largest archeological sites in SW Colorado. The unexcavated nature of the site preserves its integrity and beauty for future generations of scientists and visitors.

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Nevada

Programs: National Conservation Lands: Nevada: Gold Butte National Monument | Bureau of Land Management

BLM Nevada COVID-19 Information As the State of Nevada continues to evaluate our adaptive operations plan, all offices remain closed, but are available for scheduled appointments, as appropriate. Our employees are always available by email and phone to answer questions and assist the public with their needs.

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New Mexico

Aztec Ruins National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Pueblo people describe this site as part of their migration journey. Today you can follow their ancient passageways to a distant time. Explore a 900-year old ancestral Pueblo Great House of over 400 masonry rooms. Look up and see original timbers holding up the roof. Search for the fingerprints of ancient workers in the mortar.

Bandelier National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Bandelier National Monument protects over 33,000 acres of rugged but beautiful canyon and mesa country as well as evidence of a human presence here going back over 11,000 years. Petroglyphs, dwellings carved into the soft rock cliffs, and standing masonry walls pay tribute to the early days of a culture that still survives in the surrounding communities.

El Malpais National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

The richly diverse volcanic landscape of El Malpais offers solitude, recreation, and discovery. Explore cinder cones, lava tube caves, sandstone bluffs, and hiking trails. Wildlife abounds in the open grasslands and forests. While some may see a desolate environment, people have been adapting to and living in this extraordinary terrain for generations.

El Morro National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Imagine the refreshment of finding water after days of dusty travel. A reliable waterhole hidden at the base of a sandstone bluff made El Morro (the headland) a popular campsite for hundreds of years. Here, Ancestral Puebloans, Spanish and American travelers carved over 2,000 signatures, dates, messages, and petroglyphs.

Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument | Bureau of Land Management

Rio Puerco Field Office 100 Sun Avenue NE Albuquerque, NM 87109 35.65842306, -106.4230367 From Albuquerque, head north on I-25 and take the exit for Santo Domingo/Cochiti Lake Recreation Area (Exit 259) off I-25 onto NM 22. Follow the signs on NM 22 to Cochiti Pueblo and Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument.

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Utah

Bears Ears National Monument | Bureau of Land Management

Monticello 365 North Main Monticello, UT 84535 There is no visitor center for the National Monument. The nearest communities are Monument Valley, Mexican Hat, Bluff, Blanding, and Monticello. Highways 191, 211, 95, 261, and 163 all provide access to portions of National Monument. Major commercial airlines serve Salt Lake City and St.

Calf Creek Falls Hiking Trail

Calf Creek Falls is one of the most enchanting areas of the Grand Staircase-Escalante area, a verdant oasis amid the tumbled stone monoliths of the desert. Named for its use as a natural pen for calves back in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, the creek remained relatively unknown as a tourist destination until the formation of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, under the Clinton administration.

Cedar Breaks National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Crowning the grand staircase, Cedar Breaks sits at over 10,000 feet and looks down into a half-mile deep geologic amphitheater. Come wander among timeless bristlecone pines, stand in lush meadows of wildflower, ponder crystal-clear night skies and experience the richness of our subalpine forest.

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument | Bureau of Land Management

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument spans across nearly one million acres of America’s public lands and contains three distinct units: Grand Staircase, Kaiparowits, and Escalante Canyon. From its spectacular Grand Staircase of cliffs and terraces, across the rugged Kaiparowits Plateau to the wonders of the Escalante River Canyons, the Monument is a diverse geologic treasure speckled with monoliths, slot canyons, natural bridges, and arches.

Natural Bridges National Monument (U.S. National Park Service)

Three majestic natural bridges invite you to ponder the power of water in a landscape usually defined by its absence. View them from an overlook, or hit the trails and experience their grandeur from below. Declared a National Monument in 1908, the bridges are named “Kachina,” “Owachomo” and “Sipapu” in honor of the ancestral Puebloans who once made this place their home.

Programs: National Conservation Lands: Arizona: Vermilion Cliffs National Monument | Bureau of Land Management

This remote and unspoiled 280,000-acre monument is a geologic treasure with some of the most spectacular trails and views in the world. The monument contains many diverse landscapes, including the Paria Plateau, Vermilion Cliffs, Coyote Buttes, and Paria Canyon. The monument borders Kaibab National Forest to the west and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area to the east.

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